Diarmaid MacCulloch


Born
in Kent, The United Kingdom
October 31, 1951

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Average rating: 4.07 · 7,462 ratings · 678 reviews · 32 distinct worksSimilar authors
A History of Christianity: ...

4.10 avg rating — 4,365 ratings — published 2009 — 21 editions
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The Reformation: A History

4.08 avg rating — 2,366 ratings — published 2003 — 16 editions
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Thomas Cranmer

4.41 avg rating — 187 ratings — published 1996 — 5 editions
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Silence: A Christian History

3.71 avg rating — 195 ratings — published 2013 — 12 editions
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The Boy King: Edward VI and...

3.66 avg rating — 97 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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All Things Made New: The Re...

3.75 avg rating — 69 ratings9 editions
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The Later Reformation in En...

3.67 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 1990 — 6 editions
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Thomas Cromwell: A Life

4.13 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2018 — 7 editions
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Groundwork of Christian His...

4.33 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1987
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The Reign of Henry VIII: Po...

3.30 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1995 — 4 editions
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“Human societies are based on the human tendency to want things, and are geared to satisfying those wants: possessions or facilities to bring ease and personal satisfaction. The results are frequently disappointing, and always terminate in the embarrassing non sequitur of death.”
Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

“One should nevertheless not fall into the old stereotype of an organization that kept its place in Spanish society by sheer terror. Certainly the Inquisition used torture and executed some of its victims, but so did nearly all legal systems in Europe at the time, and it is possible to argue that the Spanish Inquisition was less bloodthirsty than most – as we will see, it showed a healthy scepticism about witches and put a stop to witch-persecution where it could”
Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation

“The end of toleration in 1685 left a legacy of bitterness and instability in France, for it failed to destroy the Huguenots, while encouraging an arrogance and exclusiveness within the established Catholic Church. In the great French. Revolution after 1789 this divide was one of the forces encouraging the extraordinary degree of revulsion against Catholic Church institutions, clergy and religious that produced the atrocities of the 1790s; beyond that it created the anticlericalism which has been so characteristic of the left in the politics of modern southern Europe. In the history of modern France, it is striking how the areas in the south that after 1572 formed the Protestant heartlands continued to form the backbone of anti-clerical, anti-monarchical voters for successive Republics, and even in the late twentieth century they were still delivering a reliable vote for French Socialism.”
Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation



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