Tim Wu

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Tim Wu

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February 2007


Tim Wu is an author, a professor at Columbia Law School, and a contributing writer for the New York Times.. He has written about technology in numerous publications, and coined the phrase "net neutrality."

Average rating: 3.9 · 9,032 ratings · 756 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Master Switch: The Rise...

3.84 avg rating — 6,508 ratings — published 2010 — 22 editions
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The Attention Merchants: Th...

4.10 avg rating — 1,996 ratings — published 2016 — 15 editions
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The Curse of Bigness: Antit...

4.12 avg rating — 85 ratings — published 2018 — 4 editions
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Tim Wu, On Copyright's Auth...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Venturers of Arasys Episode...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
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Who Controls the Internet?:...

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3.82 avg rating — 444 ratings — published 2006 — 9 editions
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The Curse of Bigness by Tim Wu
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I learned an awful lot writing it.
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The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu
“Sometimes the crowd is right; often it is wrong. It remains for science to read the balance.”
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The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu
“Industries, unlike organisms, have no organic limits on their own growth; they are constantly in search of new markets, or of new ways to exploit old ones more effectively; as Karl Marx unsympathetically observed, they ''nestle everywhere, settle everywhere, establish connexions everywhere.”
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Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami
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The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe
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“As William James observed, we must reflect that, when we reach the end of our days, our life experience will equal what we have paid attention to, whether by choice or default. We are at risk, without quite fully realizing it, of living lives that are less our own than we imagine.”
Tim Wu, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads

“It is an underacknowledged truism that, just as you are what you eat, how and what you think depends on what information you are exposed to.”
Tim Wu, The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

“It is a common enough mid-career urge: having taken care of life's immediate needs, some of us yearn to chase villains, right wrongs, fight on the side of the angels.”
Tim Wu, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads

“Disaster followed disaster... the hero stuck in there, though. Macon had long ago noticed that all adventure movies had the same moral: Perseverance pays. Just once he'd like to see a hero like himself -- not a quitter, but a man who did face facts and give up gracefully when pushing on was foolish.”
Anne Tyler, The Accidental Tourist

“...that was Julian for you: reckless. A dashing sailor, a speedy driver, a frequenter of single bars, he was the kind of man who would make a purchase without consulting _Consumer Reports_.”
Anne Tyler, The Accidental Tourist

“It is no coincidence that ours is a time afflicted by a widespread sense of attentional crisis, at least in the West - one captured by the phrase ''homo distractus,'' a species of ever shorter attention span known for compulsively checking his devices.”
Tim Wu, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads

“As William James observed, we must reflect that, when we reach the end of our days, our life experience will equal what we have paid attention to, whether by choice or default. We are at risk, without quite fully realizing it, of living lives that are less our own than we imagine.”
Tim Wu, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads

“As one might gather from a painting of him scowling in a tall stovepipe hat, Day saw himself as a businessman, not a journalist. ''He needed a newspaper not to reform, not to arouse, but to push the printing business of Benjamin H. Day.''
Day's idea was to try selling a paper for a penny - the going price for many everyday items, like soap or brushes. At that price, he felt sure he could capture a much larger audience than his 6-cent rivals. But what made the prospect risky, potentially even suicidal, was that Day would then be selling his paper at a loss. What day was contemplating was a break with the traditional strategy for making profit: selling at a price higher than the cost of production. He would instead rely on a different but historically significant business model: reselling the attention of his audience, or advertising. What Day understood-more firmly, more clearly than anyone before him-was that while his readers may have thought themselves his customers, they were in fact his product.”
Tim Wu, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads




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