Anthony Shadid


Born
in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, The United States
September 26, 1968

Died
February 16, 2012

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Anthony Shadid was a foreign correspondent for the New York Times. Until December 2009, he served as the Baghdad bureau chief of the Washington Post. Over a 15-year career, he reported from most countries in the Middle East.

Shadid won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 2004 for his coverage of the U.S. invasion of Iraq and the occupation that followed. He won the Pulitzer Prize again in 2010 for his coverage of Iraq as the United States began its withdrawal. In 2007, he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of Lebanon. He has also received the American Society of Newspaper Editors’ award for deadline writing (2004), the Overseas Press Club’s Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper or wire service reporting from ab
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Average rating: 3.74 · 2,813 ratings · 414 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
House of Stone: A Memoir of...

3.61 avg rating — 2,074 ratings — published 2012 — 20 editions
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Night Draws Near: Iraq's Pe...

4.11 avg rating — 691 ratings — published 2005 — 8 editions
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Legacy Of The Prophet: Desp...

3.89 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2000 — 6 editions
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The Washington Post Pulitze...

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The American Age, Iraq

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2012
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Taş Ev

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Kamienny dom

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Ordinary Lives

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4.89 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2009
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More books by Anthony Shadid…
“Subtle and coy, the cemento at Maalouf's did not speak of war, or frontiers, and the spaces they narrowed, but, rather, grandeur. The tiles returned one to a realm where imagination, artistry, and craftsmanship were not only appreciated but given free reign, where what was unique and striking, or small and perfect, or wrought with care was desired, where gazed-upon objects were the products of peaceful hearts, hands long practiced and trained. War ends the values and traditions that produce such treasures. Nothing is maintained. Cultures that may seem as durable as stone can break like glass, leaving all the things that held them together unattended. I believe that the craftsman, the artist, the cook, and the silversmith are peacemakers. They instill grace; they lull the world to calm.”
Anthony Shadid, House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East

“After life is bent, torn, exploded, there are shattered pieces that do not heal for years, if at all. What is left are scars and something else—shame, I suppose, shame for letting it all continue.”
Anthony Shadid, House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East

“I should be in Beirut, I thought, working as a journalist, but another part of me was so wary of that old life of guns and misery. I did not want to see Tyre again, or Qana, or Baghdad. I wanted to do nothing more than move dirt from one place to another.”
Anthony Shadid, House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East