Ippolito Nievo





Ippolito Nievo


Born
November 30, 1931

Died
March 04, 1861


Ippolito Nievo was born in 1831, in Padova (Italy) and died in a shipwreck in the Tyrrhenian Sea (1861).
After graduating in Law at the University of Padova, he refused to join his father's profession as a lawyer, because this implied an act of submission to the Austrian Government, to which the Italian region Veneto belonged.
He was politically inspired by Giuseppe Mazzini's thought and wanted to engage for the independence of Veneto and a united Italy. Therefore, he took part in the Second war of Independence following Giuseppe Garibaldi. In 1860 he enlisted with Garibaldi's Mille who, after having defeated the Borbone army in Sicily and Southern Italy, gave those regions to the King of Sardinia Vittorio Emanuele II. On 18 February 1861, It
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Average rating: 3.69 · 203 ratings · 21 reviews · 20 distinct works · Similar authors
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The Castle of Fratta

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Impressioni di Sicilia

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More books by Ippolito Nievo…
“The fact is, my dear friend, love of the truth is higher and purer than any other. The truth, however poor and naked it may be, is more lovable and more holy than any sumptuous, dressed-up falsehood. And thus every time I’m able remove some flounce or frill from you, my heart leaps in my breast and a triumphal crown girds my head. Blessed be that philosophy that teaches us that though we be mortal, weak and unhappy, we can be great in equality, liberty and love! This”
Ippolito Nievo, Confessions of an Italian

“Giustizia, verità, virtù! Tre ottime cose, tre parole; tre idee da innamorare un'anima fino alla pazzia e alla morte; ma chi le avrebbe recate di cielo in terra, per usare l'espressione di Socrate? Questa era la spina del mio cuore; e non la capiva allora così chiaramente, ma la mi doleva a sangue. Nuove istituzioni, nuove leggi, diceva Amilcare, formano uomini nuovi. Ma a volerlo anche credere, chi avrebbe dato queste ottime istituzioni, queste leggi eccellenti? Non certo gli inetti e spensierati governanti d'allora. Chi dunque?... Una gente nuova, giusta, virtuosa, sapiente; e dove e come trovarla? e come portarla a capo della cosa pubblica?”
Ippolito Nievo, Le confessioni d'un Italiano

“The good Avvocato, finding you better disposed, will receive you with more confidence. For that matter I, too, ten months ago, had few hopes of you, I tell you in all honesty, all the more so because today my hopes are great.’ ‘Oh”
Ippolito Nievo, Confessions of an Italian