James Weldon Johnson


Born
in Jacksonville, Florida, The United States
June 17, 1871

Died
June 26, 1938

Genre


James Weldon Johnson was an American author, politician, diplomat, critic, journalist, poet, anthologist, educator, lawyer, songwriter, and early civil rights activist. Johnson is remembered best for his writing, which includes novels, poems, and collections of folklore. He was also one of the first African-American professors at New York University. Later in life he was a professor of creative literature and writing at Fisk University.

Average rating: 3.95 · 10,534 ratings · 721 reviews · 69 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Autobiography of an Ex-...

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3.90 avg rating — 7,388 ratings — published 1912 — 174 editions
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God's Trombones: Seven Negr...

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4.24 avg rating — 345 ratings — published 1927 — 12 editions
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The Book of American Negro ...

4.22 avg rating — 311 ratings — published 1922 — 42 editions
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Lift Every Voice and Sing

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4.07 avg rating — 88 ratings — published 1970 — 16 editions
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The Creation

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3.87 avg rating — 70 ratings — published 1993 — 4 editions
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Along This Way: The Autobio...

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3.78 avg rating — 36 ratings7 editions
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Black Manhattan

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3.96 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 1929 — 4 editions
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Complete Poems

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3.74 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
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James Weldon Johnson: Writings

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4.06 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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The Books of American Negro...

4.36 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1940 — 4 editions
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More books by James Weldon Johnson…
“Lift every voice and sing.”
James Weldon Johnson

“New York City is the most fatally fascinating thing in America. She sits like a great witch at the gate of the country, showing her alluring white face and hiding her crooked hands and feet under the folds of her wide garments--constantly enticing thousands from far within, and tempting those who come from across the seas to go no farther. And all these become the victims of her caprice. Some she at once crushes beneath her cruel feet; others she condemns to a fate like that of galley slaves; a few she favors and fondles, riding them high on the bubbles of fortune; then with a sudden breath she blows the bubbles out and laughs mockingly as she watches them fall.”
James Weldon Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

“In the life of everyone there is a limited number of experiences which are not written upon the memory, but stamped there with a die; and in the long years after, they can be called up in detail, and every emotion that was stirred by them can be lived through anew; these are the tragedies of life.”
James Weldon Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

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