Keith Stevenson

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Keith Stevenson

Goodreads Author


Born
Glasgow, The United Kingdom
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November 2011

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Keith Stevenson is a speculative fiction writer, editor, reviewer and podcaster. His debut science fiction thriller Horizon is out now from the HarperCollins Voyager Impulse imprint. He blogs at http://keithstevensonwriter.blogspot.com

He's the editor of Dimension6, the Australian electronic magazine of speculative fiction, and the publisher with coeur de lion publishing (http://www.coeurdelion.com.au), an Australian-based independent press which has, so far, picked up four Aurealis Awards, one Ditmar, one Vogel and a World Fantasy Award for its published titles. Before starting coeur de lion, he was editor of Aurealis Magazine.

Keith produced and presented the Terra Incognita Speculative Fiction Podcast (http://www.tisf.com.au) for thirty sh
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Keith Stevenson Hi Matthew. Thanks for your questions.

For Horizon, the initial mental image I had was of an astronaut waking up from some kind of hibernation, and it…more
Hi Matthew. Thanks for your questions.

For Horizon, the initial mental image I had was of an astronaut waking up from some kind of hibernation, and it made me wonder what was happening to them and where they were. It was likely they were travelling to another planet, so as I started to expand on the idea I began to research aspects of planetary development, which led to a deeper appreciation of how climates are formed and changed by natural and 'human-made' events. At the same time there was a lot happening in the real world about climate change: climate deniers, green movements, politicians of every colour getting into the fray, and a growing feeling that nothing concrete was being done, and that certainly fed into the work at a very early stage. I started writing Horizon over ten years ago. It's depressing to see that climate change as an issue has just gotten more and more serious in the intervening years and we have yet to see a concerted multinational response to the very real threat it represents. So, yes I was influenced by the debate in Australia, but it's a debate that has been going for a long time.

In terms of Australian sci-fi and fantasy, the genres go through cycles here just like anywhere else in the world and it feels like the next wave is upon us due, in no small part, to the rise of digital publishing. Certainly in the last couple of years small and independent presses have been moving firmly into the ebook arena with established publishers like Twelfth Planet Press, Ticonderoga and (my own) coeur de lion publishing utilising digital to cut costs and reach a global market far more cheaply than we ever could before. That’s encouraged newer players like Satalyte Publishing, Spineless Wonders and so on to enter the market, so we probably have more markets and outlets for Australian speculative fiction than ever before.

And now the big publishers are moving more strongly into digital. Pan MacMillan started its Momentum imprint a couple years back and that has a strong focus on genre fiction with writers such as Greig Beck, Amanda Bridgeman, Donna Hanson and Graeme Storrs, and now HarperCollins have started up Voyager Impulse, publishing Horizon, JJ Gadd’s Lunation Series, and Alice Through the Blood-Stained Glass by Dan Adams as just the first few of a much larger cohort of genre titles in the pipeline. Add to that indie publishing successes like Mitchell Hogan, whose Crucible of Souls, won the Aurealis Award last year and has sales in the tens of thousands, and I think you could say we’re in good shape. It’s a great time for Australian genre writers with so many options out there.

Thanks again! (less)
Average rating: 3.87 · 127 ratings · 42 reviews · 12 distinct works
Horizon

3.57 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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Anywhere but Earth

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4.21 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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X6: A Novellanthology

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4.55 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
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Cock: Adventures In Masculi...

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Dimension6: Annual Collecti...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2014
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Aurealis #32

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Dimension6: Annual Collecti...

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Willow Pattern

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3.18 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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The Noobs: New Adventures i...

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4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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More books by Keith Stevenson…
La Belle Sauvage by Philip Pullman My rating: 2 of 5 stars Well that was disappointing. I loved the His Dark Materials books and their combination of imagination, action and big ideas and I looked forward to diving into Pullman's world again with the first in a prequel trilogy. The story of La Belle Sauvage starts promisingly enough. Lyra is a baby and has been ordered into the protection of a
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Topics Mentioning This Author

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Aussie Readers: Quarterly Read-a-thon Friday 2nd June - Sunday 4th June 2017 402 170 Jun 10, 2017 06:54PM  
Aussie Readers: **Winter Challenge - 1st June - 31st August 2017** 601 294 Sep 04, 2017 04:37AM  
Iain M. Banks
“the Culture had placed its bets—long before the Idiran war had been envisaged—on the machine rather than the human brain. This was because the Culture saw itself as being a self-consciously rational society; and machines, even sentient ones, were more capable of achieving this desired state as well as more efficient at using it once they had. That was good enough for the Culture.”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

Iain M. Banks
“A federated disgust, a galaxy of scorn. Us with our busy, busy little lives, finding no better way to pass our years than in competitive disdain.”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

Iain M. Banks
“It was the Culture’s fault. It considered itself too civilized and sophisticated to hate its enemies; instead it tried to understand them and their motives, so that it could out-think them and so that, when it won, it would treat them in a way which ensured they would not become enemies again. The”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

Iain M. Banks
“The only desire the Culture could not satisfy from within itself was one common to both the descendants of its original human stock and the machines they had (at however great a remove) brought into being: the urge not to feel useless. The Culture’s sole justification for the relatively unworried, hedonistic life its population enjoyed was its good works; the”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

Iain M. Banks
“Marain, the Culture’s quintessentially wonderful language (so the Culture will tell you), has, as any schoolkid knows, one personal pronoun to cover females, males, in-betweens, neuters, children, drones, Minds, other sentient machines, and every life-form capable of scraping together anything remotely resembling a nervous system and the rudiments of language (or a good excuse for not having either). Naturally, there are ways of specifying a person’s sex in Marain, but they’re not used in everyday conversation; in”
Iain M. Banks, The Player of Games




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