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Keith Stevenson

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Keith Stevenson

Goodreads Author


Born
Glasgow, The United Kingdom
Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
November 2011

URL


I'm the author of the sf thriller Horizon.
I'm also publisher at coeur de lion publishing and a past editor of Aurealis - Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy Magazine from 2001 to 2004. I hosted 30 episodes of the Terra Incognita Speculative Fiction Podcast, and edited and published Dimension6 the free Australian speculative fiction electronic magazine from 2014 to 2020.
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Keith Stevenson Hi Matthew. Thanks for your questions.

For Horizon, the initial mental image I had was of an astronaut waking up from some kind of hibernation, and it …more
Hi Matthew. Thanks for your questions.

For Horizon, the initial mental image I had was of an astronaut waking up from some kind of hibernation, and it made me wonder what was happening to them and where they were. It was likely they were travelling to another planet, so as I started to expand on the idea I began to research aspects of planetary development, which led to a deeper appreciation of how climates are formed and changed by natural and 'human-made' events. At the same time there was a lot happening in the real world about climate change: climate deniers, green movements, politicians of every colour getting into the fray, and a growing feeling that nothing concrete was being done, and that certainly fed into the work at a very early stage. I started writing Horizon over ten years ago. It's depressing to see that climate change as an issue has just gotten more and more serious in the intervening years and we have yet to see a concerted multinational response to the very real threat it represents. So, yes I was influenced by the debate in Australia, but it's a debate that has been going for a long time.

In terms of Australian sci-fi and fantasy, the genres go through cycles here just like anywhere else in the world and it feels like the next wave is upon us due, in no small part, to the rise of digital publishing. Certainly in the last couple of years small and independent presses have been moving firmly into the ebook arena with established publishers like Twelfth Planet Press, Ticonderoga and (my own) coeur de lion publishing utilising digital to cut costs and reach a global market far more cheaply than we ever could before. That’s encouraged newer players like Satalyte Publishing, Spineless Wonders and so on to enter the market, so we probably have more markets and outlets for Australian speculative fiction than ever before.

And now the big publishers are moving more strongly into digital. Pan MacMillan started its Momentum imprint a couple years back and that has a strong focus on genre fiction with writers such as Greig Beck, Amanda Bridgeman, Donna Hanson and Graeme Storrs, and now HarperCollins have started up Voyager Impulse, publishing Horizon, JJ Gadd’s Lunation Series, and Alice Through the Blood-Stained Glass by Dan Adams as just the first few of a much larger cohort of genre titles in the pipeline. Add to that indie publishing successes like Mitchell Hogan, whose Crucible of Souls, won the Aurealis Award last year and has sales in the tens of thousands, and I think you could say we’re in good shape. It’s a great time for Australian genre writers with so many options out there.

Thanks again! (less)
Average rating: 3.79 · 167 ratings · 47 reviews · 21 distinct worksSimilar authors
Horizon

3.42 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Anywhere but Earth

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4.11 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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X6: A Novellanthology

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4.38 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2009 — 3 editions
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Cock: Adventures In Masculi...

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3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings
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Dimension6: annual collecti...

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4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings2 editions
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Dimension6: Annual Collecti...

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Dimension6: annual collecti...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2014
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Aurealis #32

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More books by Keith Stevenson…

Termination Shock – Neal Stephenson

Termination Shock by Neal Stephenson
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This is the second time I’ve tried to read Termination Shock and given up. This time I managed to get past the interminable section on the queen trying to land a plane, splashed through the truly comic book alligator attack and crashed into the info-dumpy backstory of the guy who saved them.

I like Stephenson. I loved Snow Crash and Crypton Read more of this blog post »
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Published on November 24, 2022 14:42
The Dispossessed
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Keith Stevenson wrote a new blog post

Termination Shock – Neal Stephenson

Termination Shock by Neal StephensonMy rating: 2 of 5 starsThis is the second time I’ve tried to read Termination Shock and given up. This time I mana Read more of this blog post »
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Termination Shock by Neal Stephenson
Termination Shock
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This is the second time I've tried to read Termination Shock and given up. This time I managed to get past the interminable section on the queen trying to land a plane, splashed through the truly comic book alligator attack and crashed into the info- ...more
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The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
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Elder Race by Adrian Tchaikovsky
Elder Race
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Hellburner by C.J. Cherryh
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Hellburner is a direct sequel to Heavy Time and, according to Cherryh, these are the only two books that need to be read in order, which says something about how she's constructed the whole Company Wars saga with multiple entry points into the narrat ...more
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Dimension6 by Keith Stevenson
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Horizon by Keith Stevenson
Horizon
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Children of Memory by Adrian Tchaikovsky
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Schismatrix Plus by Bruce Sterling
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Gave up. Some really great situations and concepts but I have no idea what the hell the protagonist wants.
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Eyes of the Void by Adrian Tchaikovsky
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A well-written bloody good story.
More of Keith's books…

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Iain M. Banks
“the Culture had placed its bets—long before the Idiran war had been envisaged—on the machine rather than the human brain. This was because the Culture saw itself as being a self-consciously rational society; and machines, even sentient ones, were more capable of achieving this desired state as well as more efficient at using it once they had. That was good enough for the Culture.”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

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“It was the Culture’s fault. It considered itself too civilized and sophisticated to hate its enemies; instead it tried to understand them and their motives, so that it could out-think them and so that, when it won, it would treat them in a way which ensured they would not become enemies again. The”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

Iain M. Banks
“The only desire the Culture could not satisfy from within itself was one common to both the descendants of its original human stock and the machines they had (at however great a remove) brought into being: the urge not to feel useless. The Culture’s sole justification for the relatively unworried, hedonistic life its population enjoyed was its good works; the”
Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

Iain M. Banks
“They also,” [the drone] said, “refuse to acknowledge machine sentience fully; they exploit proto-conscious computers and claim only human subjective experience has any intrinsic value — carbon fascists.”
Iain M. Banks, Use of Weapons

Iain M. Banks
“Zakalwe, in all the human societies we have ever reviewed, in every age and every state, there has seldom if ever been a shortage of eager young males prepared to kill and die to preserve the security, comfort and prejudices of their elders, and what you call heroism is just an expression of this simple fact; there is never a scarcity of idiots.”’ He”
Iain M. Banks, Use of Weapons

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