Lars Brownworth


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The United States
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Lars Brownworth is an author, speaker and broadcaster based in Maryland, USA.

Mr. Brownworth created the genre-defining 12 Byzantine Rulers podcast, which prompted the New York Times to liken him to some of history's great popularizers. His recent book titled Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization, is available in bookstores and online. He answers questions on his Finding History blog, speaks at conferences and is currently working on a new podcast that brings to life the reign of the Normans.

Average rating: 4.03 · 5,750 ratings · 619 reviews · 10 distinct worksSimilar authors
Lost to the West: The Forgo...

4.08 avg rating — 3,526 ratings — published 2009 — 13 editions
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The Sea Wolves: A History o...

3.99 avg rating — 1,489 ratings — published 2014 — 11 editions
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The Normans: From Raiders t...

3.89 avg rating — 587 ratings — published 2014 — 6 editions
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In Distant Lands: A Short H...

4.30 avg rating — 44 ratings5 editions
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12 Byzantine Rulers

4.25 avg rating — 24 ratings
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Alexander III and Zoë (912-...

3.52 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2010
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Leo the Wise (886-912) (Byz...

3.56 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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Romanus Lecapenus: The Grea...

3.70 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2011
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Norman Centuries

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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The history of the Byzantin...

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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“the whole idea of a “holy” war was an alien concept to the Byzantine mind. Killing, as Saint Basil of Caesarea had taught in the fourth century, was sometimes necessary but never praiseworthy, and certainly not grounds for remission of sins. The Eastern Church had held this line tenaciously throughout the centuries, even rejecting the great warrior-emperor Nicephorus Phocas’s attempt to have soldiers who died fighting Muslims declared martyrs. Wars could, of course, be just, but on the whole diplomacy was infinitely preferable. Above all, eastern clergy were not permitted to take up arms, and the strange sight of Norman clerics armed and even leading soldiers disconcerted the watching hosts.”
Lars Brownworth, Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization

“*Vladimir had been interested in changing religions for some time. According to legend, he sent ambassadors to the major surrounding religions to help him decide. Islam was rejected for being without joy (especially in its rejection of alcohol and pork!), and Judaism was rejected since the Jews had lost their homeland and therefore seemed abandoned by God. Settling on Christianity, he sent his men to discover if the Latin or the Greek rite was better. It was hardly a fair fight. The ambassadors to the West found rather squat, dark churches, while their compatriots in Constantinople were treated to all the pageantry of a Divine Liturgy in the Hagia Sophia. “We no longer knew,” they breathlessly reported back to Vladimir, “whether we were in heaven or on earth.” The Russian prince was convinced. Within a year, he had been baptized, and Russia officially became Orthodox.”
Lars Brownworth, Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization

“on that last Monday of the empire’s history, the mood changed. There was no rest for the weary, of course, and work continued, but for the first time in weeks, the inhabitants of the city began to make their way to the Hagia Sophia. There, for the first and last time in Byzantine history, the divisions that had split the church for centuries were forgotten, Greek priests stood shoulder to shoulder with Latin ones, and a truly ecumenical service began. While the population gathered in the great church, Constantine gave a final speech—a funeral oration, as Edward Gibbon put it—for the Roman Empire. Reminding his assembled troops of their glorious history, he proudly charged them to acquit themselves with dignity and honor: “Animals may run from animals, but you are men, and worthy heirs of the great heroes of Ancient Greece and Rome.”* Turning to the Italians who were fighting in defense of Constantinople, the emperor thanked them for their service, assuring them that they were now brothers, united by a common bond. After shaking hands with each of the commanders, he dismissed them to their posts and joined the rest of the population in the Hagia Sophia.”
Lars Brownworth, Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization

Topics Mentioning This Author

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The History Book ...: GLOSSARY - BYZANTIUM (SPOILER THREAD) 45 100 Feb 22, 2012 08:21PM  
100+ Books in 2018: LH's 100+ Books in 2012 81 79 Jan 01, 2013 09:13PM  
Nothing But Readi...: Team Clint Eastwood 450 242 Aug 31, 2014 07:05AM  
A Million More Pages: This topic has been closed to new comments. * Author, Author Everywhere....!*Takotna to Ophir 166 145 Jan 23, 2016 03:59AM  
Nothing But Readi...: Lugh BOOKS READ 270 109 Jan 27, 2016 07:16AM  
Audiobooks: This topic has been closed to new comments. February 2016 480 261 Mar 01, 2016 09:13AM  
2018-2019 Reading...: 1st Quarter Challenge: Box Sets 415 740 Apr 12, 2016 01:57AM  
A Million More Pages: Lumi Meets The Mystery Machine 182 109 May 16, 2016 10:50AM  
2018-2019 Reading...: Jannene's 2016 Goal - 90 Books 9 122 Dec 10, 2016 06:07PM  


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