Jeanine Basinger


Born
February 03, 1936

Genre


Jeanine Basinger holds a BS and MS from South Dakota State University. She is a film historian, professor of Film Studies at Wesleyan University and curator and founder of The Cinema Archives at Wesleyan University. In addition, she is a trustee emeritus of the American Film Institute, a member of the Steering Committee of the National Center for Film and Video Preservation, and one of the Board of Advisors for the Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers.

She has appeared in several movie-related documentaries and completed audio commentaries on about a dozen classic films.

Average rating: 4.01 · 1,762 ratings · 221 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Star Machine

4.09 avg rating — 550 ratings — published 2007 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Silent Stars

4.09 avg rating — 330 ratings — published 1999 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Woman's View: How Hollywo...

4.13 avg rating — 141 ratings — published 1993 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
I Do and I Don't: A History...

3.20 avg rating — 165 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The It's a Wonderful Life Book

4.23 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 1986 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
American Cinema: One Hundre...

3.72 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1994
Rate this book
Clear rating
The World War II Combat Fil...

4.12 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1986 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anthony Mann

3.94 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1979 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Gene Kelly

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1976
Rate this book
Clear rating
Lana Turner

3.50 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1976
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jeanine Basinger…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“Deanna Durbin's movies are about innocence and sweetness. They're from a different time and a different place. Outside the movie house, there was Depression, poverty, war, death, and loss. Audiences then were willing to pretend, to enter into a game of escape. No one really thought that the world was like a Deanna Durbin movie, they just wanted to pretend it was for about an hour and a half.”
Jeanine Basinger, The Star Machine

“Why would everyone - in both the movie business and the audience - want to avoid the label "marriage"? Marriage was presumably everybody's business. People were either born into one, born outside of one, living in one, living outside of one, trying to woo someone into one, divorced from one, trying to get divorced from one, reading about one, dreaming about one, or just observing one from afar. For most people, it would be the central event - the biggest decision - of their lives. Marriage was the poor man's trip to Paris and the shopgirl's final goal. At the very least, it was a common touchstone. Unlike a fantasy film or a sci-fi adventure, a marriage story didn't have to be explained or defined. Unlike a western or a gangster plot, it didn't have to find a connection to bring a jolt of emotional recognition to an audience. Marriage was out there, free to be used and presented to people who knew what the deal was.”
Jeanine Basinger, I Do and I Don't: A History of Marriage in the Movies

“Marriage, after all, was the known, not the unknown: the dull dinner party, not the madcap masquerade. It was a set of issues and events that audiences knew all too well offscreen. Unlike the wide-open frontier of the western, offering freedom and adventure, or the lyrical musical, with its fantasy of release through singing and dancing, or the woman's film, with its placing of a marginalized social figure (the woman) at the center of the universe, or the gangster movie, with its violent excitement and obvious sexual freedom, the marriage film had to reflect what moviegoers already had experienced: marriage, in all its boredom and daily responsibilities.”
Jeanine Basinger, I Do and I Don't: A History of Marriage in the Movies



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jeanine to Goodreads.