Ilya Somin


Born
in Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation
June 07, 1973


Professor at the George Mason University School of Law, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, a blogger for Volokh Conspiracy, and a former co-editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review (2006 to mid-2013).

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In the process, they harm both consumers and workers seeking opportunity.
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Published on December 12, 2017 18:43 • 1 view
Average rating: 3.78 · 125 ratings · 17 reviews · 17 distinct works
Democracy and Political Ign...

3.62 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 2013 — 9 editions
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The Grasping Hand: "Kelo v....

4.15 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2015 — 5 editions
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Supreme Court Economic Revi...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2009
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Stillborn Crusade: The Trag...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1996 — 6 editions
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Supreme Court Economic Revi...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
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Supreme Court Economic Revi...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2012
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Supreme Court Economic Revi...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011
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Supreme Court Economic Revi...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2010
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Research Handbook on the Ec...

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The Supreme Court Economic ...

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“The key difference between foot voting and ballot box voting is that foot voters don’t have the same incentive to be rationally ignorant as ballot box voters do. In fact, they have strong incentives to seek out useful information. They also have much better incentives to objectively evaluate what they do learn. Unlike political fans, foot voters know they will pay a real price if they do a poor job of evaluating the information they get...
The informational advantages of foot voting over ballot box voting strengthen the case for limiting and decentralizing government. The more decentralized government is, the more issues can be decided through foot voting. It is usually much easier to vote with your feet against a local government than a state government, and much easier to do it against a state than against the federal government.
It is also usually easier to foot vote in the private sector than the public. A given region is likely to have far more private planned communities and other private sector organizations than local governments. Choosing among the former usually requires far less in the way of moving costs than choosing among the latter.
Reducing the size of government could also alleviate the problem of ignorance by making it easier for rationally ignorant voters to monitor its activities. A smaller, less complicated government is easier to keep track of.”
Ilya Somin

“There are people who learn political information for reasons other than becoming better voters. Just as sports fans love to follow their favorite teams even if they cannot influence the outcomes of games, so there are also “political fans” who enjoy following political issues and cheering for their favorite candidates, parties, or ideologies.

Unfortunately, much like sports fans, political fans tend to evaluate new information in a highly biased way. They overvalue anything that supports their preexisting views, and to undervalue or ignore new data that cuts against them, even to the extent of misinterpreting simple data that they could easily interpret correctly in other contexts. Moreover, those most interested in politics are also particularly prone to discuss it only with others who agree with their views, and to follow politics only through like-minded media.”
Ilya Somin

“There is no easy solution to the problem of political ignorance. But we can significantly mitigate it by making more of our decisions by “voting with our feet” and fewer at the ballot box. Two types of foot voting have important informational advantages over ballot box voting. The first is when we vote with our feet in the private sector, by choosing which products to buy or which civil society organizations to join. The other is choosing what state or local government to live under in a federal system - a decision often influenced by the quality of those jurisdictions’ public policy.”
Ilya Somin



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