Jeremy McCarter



Average rating: 4.47 · 37,677 ratings · 4,841 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
Young Radicals: In the War ...

4.05 avg rating — 177 ratings4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hamilton: The Revolution

by
4.47 avg rating — 37,478 ratings — published 2016 — 14 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Bite the Hand That Feeds Yo...

by
4.14 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2009 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hamilton: The Revolution

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hamilton: The Revolution: L...

by
0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jeremy McCarter…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“On opening night, standing under the Rogers's marquee, [Lin] realized that if Eliza's struggle was the element of Hamilton's story that had inspired him the most, then the show itself was a part of her legacy.”
Jeremy McCarter, Hamilton: The Revolution

“The myth of 'You have to be a tortured artist' is a myth," says Lin. "You can have a happy, healthy life and still go to all these crazy dark places in your writing, and then go play with your child and hug your wife.”
Jeremy McCarter, Hamilton: The Revolution

“Looking back now, success seems foreordained. It wasn't. No colonists in the history of the world had defeated their mother country on the battlefield to win their independence. Few republics had managed--or even attempted--to govern an area bigger than a city-state. Somehow, in defiance to all precedent, Washington, Hamilton, and the other founders pulled off both.
Their deliriously unlikely success--first as soldiers, then as statesmen--tends to obscure the true lessons of the American Revolution. The past places no absolute limit on the future. Even the unlikeliest changes can occur. But change requires hope--in the case of both those unlikely victories, the hope that the American people could defy all expectation to overcome their differences and set each other free.
in the summer of 1788, Alexander Hamilton carried this message to Poughkeepsie, where he pleaded with New York's leaders to trust in the possibilities of the union, and vote to ratify the new federal Constitution. Yes, he conceded, the 13 newborn states included many different kinds of people. But this did not mean that the government was bound to fail. It took an immigrant to fully understand the new nation, and to declare a fundamental hope of the American experiment: Under wise government, these diverse men and women "will be constantly assimilating, till they embrace each other, and assume the same complexion.”
Jeremy McCarter, Hamilton: The Revolution

Topics Mentioning This Author



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jeremy to Goodreads.