Steven Rinella

Steven Rinella


Born
The United States
Genre


Average rating: 4.3 · 3,923 ratings · 396 reviews · 14 distinct worksSimilar authors
American Buffalo: In Search...

4.17 avg rating — 1,557 ratings — published 2008 — 12 editions
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Meat Eater: Adventures from...

4.34 avg rating — 1,147 ratings — published 2012 — 8 editions
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The Scavenger's Guide to Ha...

4.22 avg rating — 578 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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The Complete Guide to Hunti...

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4.68 avg rating — 339 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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The Complete Guide to Hunti...

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4.65 avg rating — 185 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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The Scavenger's Guide: A Ye...

4.62 avg rating — 45 ratings — published 2006 — 2 editions
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Grand Theft Cattle

4.24 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Me, Myself, and Ribeye

4.19 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Buy the Seat of Their Pants

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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The MeatEater Game and Fish...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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“Maybe stalking the woods is as vital to the human condition as playing music or putting words to paper. Maybe hunting has as much of a claim on our civilized selves as anything else. After all, the earliest forms of representational art reflect hunters and prey. While the arts were making us spiritually viable, hunting did the heavy lifting of not only keeping us alive, but inspiring us. To abhor hunting is to hate the place from which you came, which is akin to hating yourself in some distant, abstract way.”
Steven Rinella, Meat Eater: Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter

“My own reasoning was certainly complicated, so much so that I can’t fully explain it. At some level, I’m sure I viewed the act of releasing fish as a form of contrition. There was definitely a connection in my mind—or reverse connection, as it were—between killing upward of a thousand furbearing mammals for money and then spending money in order to let other creatures live. And while one might argue that you can do a better job of letting things live by not catching them in the first place, you can’t actively let them live until you’ve had a chance to kill them.”
Steven Rinella, Meat Eater: Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter

“To sit in a tree and watch the coming of dawn is a strange thing. As soon as you can see the ground with any detail it seems that you’re twice as high as you thought you were. Tree stumps go through brief periods when they look like people. The root wads of overturned trees look like bears. You can’t tell whether the trail you’re sitting along passes through a large meadow you should have noticed earlier or just a slight opening in the trees that you wouldn’t have noticed earlier. But as the light comes up enough to make out the individual leaves on the ground, you realize that you’re only as high as you thought you were. The stumps go back to being stumps, the root wads back to root wads. The trail begins to look like how you remembered it.”
Steven Rinella, Meat Eater: Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Reading with Style: This topic has been closed to new comments. Completed Tasks 916 87 Feb 28, 2017 09:01PM  


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