Khaled Anatolios



Khaled Anatolios (PhD, Boston College) is professor of historical theology in the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. He is the author of Retrieving Nicaea: The Development and Meaning of Trinitarian Doctrine and two volumes on Athanasius.

Average rating: 4.28 · 160 ratings · 29 reviews · 7 distinct worksSimilar authors
Retrieving Nicaea: The Deve...

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4.46 avg rating — 85 ratings — published 2011 — 5 editions
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Athanasius

4.13 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 1998 — 16 editions
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The Holy Trinity in the Lif...

4.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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Deification through the Cro...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings3 editions
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Catholicism & Orthodox Chri...

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2001 — 5 editions
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Journal of Early Christian ...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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Letter & Spirit, Vol. 11: "...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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“When the meaning of trinitarian doctrine is located principally in some particular creaturely analogue, it becomes separable from other aspects of the Christian mystery. Instead of trinitarian meaning being embedded in the whole nexus of Christian faith, it tends to be reduced to the features of the analogue itself.”
Khaled Anatolios, Retrieving Nicaea: The Development and Meaning of Trinitarian Doctrine

“Surely Rahner is right: the meaning of trinitarian doctrine must have a more intrinsic connection to the structure and texture of the whole of Christian life and faith.”
Khaled Anatolios, Retrieving Nicaea: The Development and Meaning of Trinitarian Doctrine

“Although we cannot encompass God’s trinitarian being within our human knowledge, we can know and glorify God as Trinity and be consciously and thankfully incorporated into trinitarian life. Thus appropriating the meaning of trinitarian doctrine involves learning to think, live, and pray so as to refer to God’s being as Trinity while at the same time learning to disavow a comprehensive epistemic hold on the God to whom we thus refer ourselves.”
Khaled Anatolios, Retrieving Nicaea: The Development and Meaning of Trinitarian Doctrine



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