Arthur Green



Average rating: 4.19 · 904 ratings · 99 reviews · 68 distinct worksSimilar authors
Judaism's Ten Best Ideas: A...

4.28 avg rating — 162 ratings — published 2014 — 6 editions
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Radical Judaism: Rethinking...

4.25 avg rating — 106 ratings — published 2010 — 4 editions
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A Guide to the Zohar

4.13 avg rating — 105 ratings — published 2003 — 3 editions
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Seek My Face: A Jewish Myst...

4.19 avg rating — 103 ratings — published 1992 — 8 editions
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Ehyeh: A Kabbalah for Tomorrow

4.06 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 2002 — 7 editions
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Tormented Master

3.98 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 1979 — 8 editions
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These Are the Words: A Voca...

3.97 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1999 — 8 editions
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Your Word Is Fire: The Hasi...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 1987 — 6 editions
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Speaking Torah Vol 1: Spiri...

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4.37 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
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Menahem Mahum of Chernobyl:...

3.92 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1982
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“Pathways toward a New Shabbat Do 1. Stay at home. Spend quality time with family and real friends. 2. Celebrate with others: at the table, in the synagogue, with friends or community. 3. Study or read something that will edify, challenge, or make you grow. 4. Be alone. Take some time for yourself. Check in with yourself. Review your week. Ask yourself where you are in your life. 5. Mark the beginning and end of this sacred time by lighting candles and making kiddush on Friday night and saying havdalah on Saturday night. Don’t 6. Don’t do anything you have to do for your work life. This includes obligatory reading, homework for kids (even without writing!), unwanted social obligations, and preparing for work as well as doing your job itself. 7. Don’t spend money. Separate completely from the commercial culture that surrounds us so much. This includes doing business of all sorts. No calls to the broker, no following up on ads, no paying of bills. It can all wait. 8. Don’t use the computer. Turn off the iPhone or smartphone or whatever device has replaced it by the time you read this. Live and breathe for a day without checking messages. Declare your freedom from this new master of our minds and our time. Find the time for face-to-face conversations with people around you, without Facebook. 9. Don’t travel. Avoid especially commercial travel and places like airports, hotel check-ins, and similar depersonalizing encounters. Stay free of situations in which people are likely to tell you to “have a nice day” (Shabbat already is a nice day, thank you). 10. Don’t rely on commercial or canned video entertainment, including the TV as well as the computer screen. Discover what there is to do in life when you are not being entertained.”
Arthur Green, Judaism's Ten Best Ideas: A Brief Guide for Seekers

“Ten Pathways toward a New Shabbat Do 1. Stay at home. Spend quality time with family and real friends. 2. Celebrate with others: at the table, in the synagogue, with friends or community. 3. Study or read something that will edify, challenge, or make you grow. 4. Be alone. Take some time for yourself. Check in with yourself. Review your week. Ask yourself where you are in your life. 5. Mark the beginning and end of this sacred time by lighting candles and making kiddush on Friday night and saying havdalah on Saturday night.”
Arthur Green, Judaism's Ten Best Ideas: A Brief Guide for Seekers

“That One is Being itself, the constant in the endlessly changing evolutionary parade."
"Nuclear physicists and cosmologists have become the new Kabbalists of our age, speculating in ever more refined ways on the first few seconds of existence much as our mystical sages meditated on the highest triad of the ten divine emanations."
"How would such a reframed tale read? It would be a narrative of the great reaching out by the inner One that inhabits each of us and binds us all together, a constant stretching forth of Y-H-W-H ("Being") in the endless adventure of becoming HWYH (Hebrew for ''being'' or "existence"), or of the One garbing itself in the multicolored garment of diversity and multiplicity."
"I do not view humans - surely not as we are now - as the end purpose of evolution. We, like all other species, are a step along the way. If existence survives on this planet, Mind will one day be manifest to a degree far beyond our present ability to comprehend or predict. On that day, says Scripture, "Earth will be filled with knowledge of Y-H-W-H as water fills the sea" (Isaiah 11:9) - just that wholly and naturally.”
Arthur Green, Radical Judaism: Rethinking God and Tradition



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