Frank Yerby


Born
in Augusta, Georgia, The United States
September 05, 1916

Died
November 29, 1991

Website


Born in Augusta, Georgia to Rufus Garvin Yerby, an African American, and Wilhelmina Smythe, who was caucasian. He graduated from Haines Normal Institute in Augusta and graduated from Paine College in 1937. Thereafter, Yerby enrolled in Fisk University where he received his Master's degree in 1938. In 1939, Yerby entered the University of Chicago to work toward his doctorate but later left the university. Yerby taught briefly at Florida A&M University and at Southern University in Baton Rouge.

Frank Yerby rose to fame as a writer of popular fiction tinged with a distinctive southern flavor. In 1946 he became the first African-American to publish a best-seller with The Foxes of Harrow. That same year he also became the first African-Americ
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Average rating: 3.83 · 4,182 ratings · 313 reviews · 40 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Foxes of Harrow

3.97 avg rating — 556 ratings — published 1946 — 25 editions
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The Saracen Blade

3.89 avg rating — 332 ratings — published 1952 — 11 editions
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A Woman Called Fancy

3.77 avg rating — 315 ratings6 editions
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Goat Song

3.85 avg rating — 257 ratings — published 1967 — 6 editions
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The Golden Hawk

3.84 avg rating — 227 ratings — published 1948 — 12 editions
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Fairoaks

3.85 avg rating — 219 ratings — published 1957 — 13 editions
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Judas My Brother

3.95 avg rating — 202 ratings — published 1968 — 6 editions
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The Devil's Laughter

3.89 avg rating — 170 ratings — published 1953 — 11 editions
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Pride's Castle

3.72 avg rating — 169 ratings — published 1949 — 12 editions
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An Odor of Sanctity

3.95 avg rating — 170 ratings — published 1965 — 9 editions
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More books by Frank Yerby…
The Dahomean
(2 books)
by
4.09 avg rating — 103 ratings

“Ill tell you the one that I think will: when a mans in love he wants to keep the one he loves- and cherish her. He wants to build a picket fence twixt them and the world. He doesn't want it temporary, a secret, hidden. He wants the world to know. The one he loves is somebody to him, not a thing to be taken, used and tossed aside. Hell, I'm not saying he shouldn't be interested in your pretty ankles and what a nice sway your bustles got. That's part of it too; but only a part. The rest of it is the long years ahead, the laughing together, and the crying, bringing up your kids, nodding together under the lamplight when your heads have turned white, and finally lying together forever in the long dark...”
Frank Yerby, A Woman Called Fancy

“And oh, what a mercy it is that these women do not exercise their powers oftener! We can't resist them, if they do. Let them show ever so little inclination, and men go down on their knees at once-old or ugly, it is all the same. And this I set down as a positive truth. A woman with fair opportunities, and without an absolute hump, may marry WHOM SHE LIKES. Only let us be thankful that the darlings are like the beasts of the field, and don't know their own power. They would overcome us entirely if they did.”
Frank Yerby, A Woman Called Fancy

“When it was over, it was not really over, and that was the trouble.”
Frank Yerby

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