Heather Cox Richardson


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Average rating: 4.26 · 2,435 ratings · 482 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
How the South Won the Civil...

4.36 avg rating — 1,599 ratings — published 2020 — 9 editions
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To Make Men Free: A History...

4.20 avg rating — 277 ratings — published 2014 — 8 editions
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Wounded Knee: Party Politic...

4.18 avg rating — 208 ratings — published 2009 — 9 editions
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West from Appomattox: The R...

3.80 avg rating — 231 ratings — published 2007 — 6 editions
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Death of Reconstruction: Ra...

3.85 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 2001 — 4 editions
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The Greatest Nation of the ...

3.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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The South Since the War: As...

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3.82 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2004 — 15 editions
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Eyewitness at Wounded Knee

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4.05 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1920 — 3 editions
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Voter Suppression in U.S. E...

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4.33 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 2020 — 4 editions
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“A new breed of Republicans has taken over the GOP. It is a new breed which is seeking to sell to Americans a doctrine which is as old as mankind—the doctrine of racial division, the doctrine of racial prejudice, the doctrine of white supremacy,” Robinson said. He added that he now knew “how it felt to be a Jew in Hitler’s Germany.”40”
Heather Cox Richardson, How the South Won the Civil War: Oligarchy, Democracy, and the Continuing Fight for the Soul of America

“The search for majorities always results in either greater disfranchisement or wider suffrage, and in this case, leaders reached out to poor white men for their victories.”
Heather Cox Richardson, How the South Won the Civil War: Oligarchy, Democracy, and the Continuing Fight for the Soul of America

“In 1951, William F. Buckley Jr., a devout Catholic fresh out of Yale, the son of an oilman, suggested a new approach to destroying the liberal consensus. In God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of “Academic Freedom,” Buckley suggested that the whole idea that people would make good decisions through argument based on evidence—the Enlightenment idea that had shaped America since its founding—was wrong. Had that been true, Americans would not have kept supporting the government activism launched by the New Deal. Americans’ faith in reasoned debate was a worse “superstition,” he said, than the superstitions the Enlightenment had set out to replace.15 Rather than continuing to try to change people’s beliefs through evidence-based arguments, he said, those opposed to the New Deal should stand firm on an “orthodoxy” of religion and individualism and refuse to accept any questioning of those two fundamental p”
Heather Cox Richardson, How the South Won the Civil War: Oligarchy, Democracy, and the Continuing Fight for the Soul of America



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