Gerard K. O'Neill


Born
in Brooklyn, New York, The United States
February 06, 1927

Died
April 27, 1992


Gerard Kitchen O'Neill

Average rating: 4.15 · 440 ratings · 51 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
The High Frontier: Human Co...

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4.19 avg rating — 371 ratings — published 1977 — 12 editions
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2081: A Hopeful View of the...

3.98 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 1981 — 4 editions
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Technology Edge

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1983 — 2 editions
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Space Settlements: A Design...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004
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Space-Based Manufacturing f...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1977
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Space Settlements: A Design...

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3.91 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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More books by Gerard K. O'Neill…
“Yet all the projections confirm that SSPS plants built at a space manufacturing facility out of nonterrestrial materials should be able to undersell electricity produced by any alternative source here on Earth.”
Gerard K. O'Neill, The High Frontier: Human Colonies in Space

“A number of the features of floater transportation that Eric notices will be determined by competition. In an era when private cars will be computerized, so that passengers may read or watch television as they drive to work, floater lines will only be able to compete if they provide direct nonstop rather than multiple-stop service. Also, station facilities can be smaller if they only have to handle one floater at a time, rather than a train of them. Psychologists have found that the popularity of automobiles depends in part on their privacy: they are secure little rolling homes, protected against the unwanted intrusions of public transportation, such as squalling babies or chatty neighbors. Floaters will provide privacy for individuals, or for parties of two or four traveling together-and they will provide that privacy while moving their passengers at ten times the speed of an automobile.”
Gerard K. O'Neill, 2081

“In a few moments the sign changed to the personal radio nickname of the car owner, and a little later it switched to a political slogan advocating the election of a candidate.”
Gerard K. O'Neill, 2081