Cathy Park Hong


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Cathy Park Hong’s book of creative nonfiction, Minor Feelings, was published in Spring 2020 by One World/Random House (US) and Profile Books (UK). She is also the author of poetry collections Engine Empire, published in 2012 by W.W. Norton, Dance Dance Revolution, chosen by Adrienne Rich for the Barnard Women Poets Prize, and Translating Mo'um. Hong is the recipient of the Windham-Campbell Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Her poems have been published in Poetry, A Public Space, Paris Review, McSweeney's, Baffler, Yale Review, The Nation, and other journals. She is the poetry editor of the New Republic and is a professor at Rutgers-Newark University. ...more

Average rating: 4.29 · 13,637 ratings · 1,835 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
Minor Feelings: An Asian Am...

4.31 avg rating — 12,477 ratings — published 2020 — 11 editions
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Dance Dance Revolution

3.96 avg rating — 543 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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Engine Empire: Poems

4.12 avg rating — 482 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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Translating Mo'um

4.05 avg rating — 79 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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My Daily Actions, or the Me...

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3.92 avg rating — 24 ratings
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American Journal: Fifty Poe...

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4.15 avg rating — 442 ratings — published 2018 — 4 editions
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Phone Bells Keep Ringing fo...

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4.57 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2020 — 2 editions
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Brooklyn Poets Anthology

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4.78 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2017 — 4 editions
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“Patiently educating a clueless white person about race is draining. It takes all your powers of persuasion. Because it’s more than a chat about race. It’s ontological. It’s like explaining to a person why you exist, or why you feel pain, or why your reality is distinct from their reality. Except it’s even trickier than that. Because the person has all of Western history, politics, literature, and mass culture on their side, proving that you don’t exist.”
Cathy Park Hong, Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning

“When I hear the phrase “Asians are next in line to be white,” I replace the word “white” with “disappear.” Asians are next in line to disappear. We are reputed to be so accomplished, and so law-abiding, we will disappear into this country’s amnesiac fog. We will not be the power but become absorbed by power, not share the power of whites but be stooges to a white ideology that exploited our ancestors. This country insists that our racial identity is beside the point, that it has nothing to do with being bullied, or passed over for promotion, or cut off every time we talk. Our race has nothing to do with this country, even, which is why we’re often listed as “Other” in polls and why we’re hard to find in racial breakdowns on reported rape or workplace discrimination or domestic abuse. It’s like being ghosted, I suppose, where, deprived of all social cues, I have no relational gauge for my own behavior. I ransack my mind for what I could have done, could have said. I stop trusting what I see, what I hear. My ego is in free fall while my superego is boundless, railing that my existence is not enough, never enough, so I become compulsive in my efforts to do better, be better, blindly following this country’s gospel of self-interest, proving my individual worth by expanding my net worth, until I vanish.”
Cathy Park Hong, Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning

“One characteristic of racism is that children are treated like adults and adults are treated like children. Watching a parent being debased like a child is the deepest shame. I cannot count the number of times I have seen my parents condescended to or mocked by white adults. This was so customary that when my mother had any encounter with a white adult, I was always hypervigilant, ready to mediate or pull her away. To grow up Asian in America is to witness the humiliation of authority figures like your parents and to learn not to depend on them: they cannot protect you.”
Cathy Park Hong, Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning

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