Elizabeth Speller

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Pascale...
201 books | 1,080 friends

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Elizabeth Speller

Goodreads Author


Born
The United Kingdom
Website

Twitter

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Member Since
February 2010


Elizabeth Speller is a poet and author of four non-fiction books including a biography of Emperor Hadrian, companion guides to Rome and to Athens, and a memoir, Sunlight on the Garden. She has contributed to publications as varied as the Financial Times, Big Issue and Vogue and produced the libretto for a requiem for Linda McCartney, Farewell, composed by Michael Berkeley (OUP). She currently has a Royal Literary Fund Fellowship at Warwick and divides her life between Gloucestershire and Greece. She was a prize-winner in both the Ledbury and Bridport poetry competitions in 2008, and her poem, 'Finistere' was shortlisted for the Forward Poetry Prize in 2009. More profitably she is also a ghost blogger. ...more

Average rating: 3.68 · 5,326 ratings · 917 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Return of Captain John ...

3.68 avg rating — 3,195 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
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The Strange Fate of Kitty E...

3.69 avg rating — 1,396 ratings — published 2011 — 17 editions
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The First of July

3.76 avg rating — 496 ratings — published 2013 — 17 editions
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Following Hadrian: A Second...

3.47 avg rating — 116 ratings — published 2002 — 9 editions
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The Sunlight on the Garden:...

3.51 avg rating — 49 ratings — published 2006 — 4 editions
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At Break of Day

4.05 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2013 — 6 editions
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Granta City Guides: Rome

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2005
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Granta City Guide: Athens

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2007
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The Hedge of Thorns

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2017 — 6 editions
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Laurence Bartram Mysteries ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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More books by Elizabeth Speller…

The Isle is Full of Noises

I love the Scops owl; small enough to sit on a human hand - about 5” high - with a hooked beak and expression of utmost ferocity, it clearly has no idea that it is not as impressively fierce or as romantically Gothic as its many cousins.


...Meanwhile, Igor, the white dog next door on the goat-and-chicken smallholding (equally unaware of how small and, in his case, fluffily unimpressive, he is) ope Read more of this blog post »
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Published on May 13, 2013 07:47
The Return of Captain John ... The Strange Fate of Kitty E...
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3.68 avg rating — 4,591 ratings

Quotes by Elizabeth Speller  (?)
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“He had long been indifferent to which side won; he wished only that one or the other would do so decisively while he was still alive.”
Elizabeth Speller

“Think not lightly, therefore, O Hadrian, of what I am saying. Boast not that you alone have encircled the world in your travels, for it is only the moon and stars that really make the journey around it. Moreover, do not think of yourself as beautiful and great and rich and the ruler of the inhabited world. Know you not that, being a man, you were born to be Life’s plaything, helpless in the hands of fortune and destiny, sometimes exalted, sometimes humbled lower than the grave. Will you not be able to learn what life is, Hadrian, in the light of many examples? Consider how rich with his golden nails was the king of the Lydians. Great as a commander of armies was the king of the Danaans, Agamemnon; daring and hardy was Alexander, king of the Macedonians. Heracles was fearless, the Cyclops wild and untamed, Odysseus shrewd and subtle, and Achilles beautiful to look upon. If fortune took away from these men the distinctions that were peculiarly their own, how much more likely is she to take them away from you?”
Elizabeth Speller, Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire

“The Romans learned what European armies were to discover hundreds of years later: that the best-trained and best-equipped fighting force in the world might come to grief against partisans fighting on their own territory and for a cause for which they would willingly sacrifice themselves and their families.”
Elizabeth Speller, Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire

Polls

January/February 2013 Group Read

 
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“The Romans learned what European armies were to discover hundreds of years later: that the best-trained and best-equipped fighting force in the world might come to grief against partisans fighting on their own territory and for a cause for which they would willingly sacrifice themselves and their families.”
Elizabeth Speller, Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire

“There was a young man who said "God
Must find it exceedingly odd
To think that the tree
Should continue to be
When there's no one about in the quad."

Reply:
"Dear Sir: Your astonishment's odd;
I am always about in the quad.
And that's why the tree
Will continue to be
Since observed by, Yours faithfully, God.”
Ronald Knox




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