Peter Allison





Peter Allison


Born
Australia
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Peter Allison is an Australian writer whose books have focused on his time as an African safari guide, as well as his time in South America. He grew up in Sydney but at the age of 16 won a scholarship for study in Japan.[1] At 19 he travelled to Africa and became a guide for the Classic Safari Company.

He currently lives in Cape Town with his wife Pru, and their pet dog Mombo, where he works for Wilderness Safaris.

Average rating: 3.92 · 7,806 ratings · 837 reviews · 14 distinct worksSimilar authors
Whatever You Do, Don't Run:...

3.92 avg rating — 6,429 ratings — published 2007 — 28 editions
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Don't Look Behind You! A Sa...

3.97 avg rating — 1,003 ratings — published 2009 — 13 editions
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How to Walk a Puma: And Oth...

3.78 avg rating — 334 ratings — published 2011 — 13 editions
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David Adjaye: Houses; Recyc...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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David Adjaye: Making Public...

4.10 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2006 — 2 editions
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David Adjaye: Constructed N...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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David Adjaye and Adjaye / A...

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David Adjaye: Form, Heft, M...

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3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2015
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Adjaye: Africa: Architectur...

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3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings
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African Metropolitan Archit...

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did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011
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“Like every other guide or wildlife lover who is eventually eaten or trampled, I felt that I had a bond with this herd that would make me safe with them. I wanted to try my luck again.”
Peter Allison, Whatever You Do, Don't Run: True Tales Of A Botswana Safari Guide

“She asked another question: "What does it matter if the rhinos die out? Is it really important that they are saved?"

This would normally have riled me... but I had come to think of her as Dr. Spock from Star Trek - an emotionless, purely logical creature, at least with regards to her feelings for animals. Like Spock, though, I knew there were one or two things that stirred her, so I gave an honest reply.

"... to be honest, it doesn't matter. No economy will suffer, nobody will go hungry, no diseases will be spawned. Yet there will never be a way to place a value on what we have lost. Future children will see rhinos only in books and wonder how we let them go so easily. It would be like lighting a fire in the Louvre and watching the Mona Lisa burn. Most people would think 'What a pity' and leave it at that while only a few wept”
Peter Allison, Whatever You Do, Don't Run: True Tales Of A Botswana Safari Guide

“This tree, though, had not been fed on, so it was apparent that the culprit was a bull (elephant) who was filled with testosterone but no outlet for it, so he pushed over trees. It's a great release for a bull and a way of showing his strength after a female has rejected him. If human males had the same ability, global deforestation would be complete by now.”
Peter Allison, Whatever You Do, Don't Run: True Tales Of A Botswana Safari Guide



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