Elinor M. Brent-Dyer


Born
in South Shields, Northumberland, The United Kingdom
April 06, 1894

Died
September 20, 1969

Genre


Elinor M. Brent-Dyer was born as Gladys Eleanor May Dyer on 6th April 1894, in South Shields in the industrial northeast of England, and grew up in a terraced house which had no garden or inside toilet. She was the only daughter of Eleanor Watson Rutherford and Charles Morris Brent Dyer. Her father, who had been married before, left home when she was three years old. In 1912, her brother Henzell died at age 17 of cerebro-spinal fever. After her father died, her mother remarried in 1913.

Elinor was educated at a small local private school in South Shields and returned there to teach when she was eighteen after spending two years at the City of Leeds Training College. Her teaching career spanned 36 years, during which she taught in a wide vari
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Average rating: 3.98 · 19,635 ratings · 1,115 reviews · 135 distinct worksSimilar authors
The School at the Chalet

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Jo of the Chalet School

4.15 avg rating — 969 ratings — published 1926 — 8 editions
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The Chalet School and Jo

4.18 avg rating — 525 ratings — published 1930 — 4 editions
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The Princess of the Chalet ...

4.09 avg rating — 533 ratings — published 1927 — 12 editions
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The Chalet School in Exile

4.36 avg rating — 439 ratings — published 1940 — 9 editions
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The Head Girl of the Chalet...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 422 ratings — published 1928 — 6 editions
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Eustacia Goes to the Chalet...

4.01 avg rating — 389 ratings — published 1930 — 6 editions
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Jo Returns to the Chalet Sc...

4.14 avg rating — 338 ratings — published 1936 — 2 editions
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Rivals of the Chalet School

4.02 avg rating — 385 ratings — published 1929 — 9 editions
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The Chalet Girls in Camp

4.02 avg rating — 339 ratings — published 1930 — 9 editions
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More books by Elinor M. Brent-Dyer…
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More series by Elinor M. Brent-Dyer…
“Whenever anyone suggested that she looked as if she'd been dragged through a hedge backwards, she used to groan loudly and ram in a few more pins until her head was a complete porcupine's back of hairpins!”
Elinor M. Brent-Dyer
tags: hair

“Much as Joanne disliked needlework, she was quite good at it, for she had been well taught. But hearing the remark from her governess's lips was almost more than the child could bear. And as for childish games -
"Cousin Ambrose has been teaching me to play chess," she said in her curiously deep voice. "And we sometimes play cribbage and ecarte."
"Still, at your age, there is so much to learn that I think we must dedicate this hour to sewing each night. And now, tell me, what is your favourite lesson?"
Joanne eyed the lady for a moment. Then, "Latin and 'cello," she said sweetly.
She was not disappointed. Miss Mercier's face fell.
"Latin? Oh my dear, I am very sorry to hear that. Latin is essential for boys, of course; but I cannot think it necessary for a girl in your position. But you cannot have gone very far in it yet?"
"We were doing the Aenid at school when I left," said Joanne briskly. "Fourth book. And Caesar, of course. I've learnt Latin for years."
"My dear child, you mustn't exaggerate. That is most unladylike. I suppose you began two years ago? You cannot call two years "years" in the sense you did."
"I didn't. I began Latin when I was seven. My father taught me."
This was worse than Miss Mercier had expected.”
Elinor M. Brent-Dyer, The Lost Staircase

“That wood," he said, pointing back to the pinewood on the mound, "is used for any building that goes on here. So is the one right over there; it is beech, elm and oak. We never buy a plank of timber here. And we never cut down a tree unless it is necessary. And whatever tree is cut down, is always replaced by a sapling of the same kind. That is another of our traditions. The result is that our woods never grow less. Even in the last war, when so much had to be cut for the Government, we replanted as fast as we cut down. I have a forestry man in charge, and we pride ourselves on our beautiful timber.”
Elinor M. Brent-Dyer, The Lost Staircase

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