Tatian the Assyrian


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Influences


Tatian the Assyrian (c. 120 – c. 180 AD) was an Assyrian early Christian writer and theologian of the 2nd century.

Tatian's most influential work is the Diatessaron, a Biblical paraphrase, or "harmony", of the four gospels that became the standard text of the four gospels in the Syriac-speaking churches until the 5th-century, when it gave way to the four separate gospels in the Peshitta version

Concerning the date and place of his birth, little is known beyond what he tells about himself in his Oratio ad Graecos, chap. xlii (Ante-Nicene Fathers, ii. 81–82): that he was born in "the land of the Assyrians"; current scholarly consensus is that he died c. 185 AD, perhaps in Assyria.

He came to Rome, where he see
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Average rating: 4.14 · 69 ratings · 15 reviews · 8 distinct works
The Diatessaron

4.38 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2001 — 10 editions
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Tatian's Address to the Greeks

3.45 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 1982 — 9 editions
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The Writings of Tatian and ...

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4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2009
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Tatiani Oratio Ad Graecos. ...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1995
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Tatian: Lateinisch Und Altd...

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The Sacred Writings of Tati...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
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Fathers of the Second Centu...

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4.20 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 1896 — 14 editions
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A Dissertation on the Gospe...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013 — 10 editions
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“For the heavenly Logos, a spirit emanating from the Father and a Logos from the Logos-power, in imitation of the Father who begot Him made man an image of immortality, so that, as incorruption is with God, in like manner, man, sharing in a part of God, might have the immortal principle also. The Logos, too, before the creation of men, was the Framer of angels. And each of these two orders of creatures was made free to act as it pleased, not having the nature of good, which again is with God alone, but is brought to perfection in men through their freedom of choice, in order that the bad man may be justlypunished, having become depraved through his own fault, but the just man be deservedly praised for his virtuous deeds, since in the exercise of his free choice he refrained from transgressing the will of God. Such is the constitution of things in reference to angels and men. And the power of the Logos, having in itself a faculty to foresee future events, not as fated, but as taking place by the choice of free agents, foretold from time to time the issues of things to come; it also became a forbidder of wickedness by means of prohibitions, and the encomiast of those who remained good. And, when men attached themselves to one who was more subtle than the rest, having regard to his being the first-born, and declared him to be God, though he was resisting the law of God, then the power of the Logos excluded the beginner of the folly and his adherents from all fellowship with Himself. And so he who was made in the likeness of God, since the more powerful spirit is separated from him, becomes mortal; but that first-begotten one through his transgression and ignorance becomes a demon; and they who imitated him, that is his illusions, have become a host of demons, and through their freedom of choice have been given up to their own infatuation.”
Tatian the Assyrian, Tatian's Address to the Greeks

“If you had known this: I love mercy, 45 not sacrifice, you would not have condemned those on whom is no blame.”
Tatian the Assyrian, The Diatessaron

“Which is better, that it should be said to the paralytic, Your sins are forgiven you, or that it should be said 20 to him, Arise, and take your bed, and walk?”
Tatian the Assyrian, The Diatessaron



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