Allan J. "Alonzo" Wind

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Allan J. "Alonzo" Wind

Goodreads Author


Born
Brooklyn NY, The United States
Website

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Member Since
March 2014


Allan J. "Alonzo" Wind
Mr. Wind is a retired Senior Foreign Service Officer from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), having worked off and on with the Agency primarily overseas on diplomatic assignments from 1990 to 2019 in the Peru, Nicaragua, Angola, Nigeria, Iraq, Afghanistan and South Africa and the Southern Africa Regional Missions. In these roles he provided oversight to U.S. government foreign aid development and humanitarian assistance, and supported U.S. Ambassadors as their senior development officer on multiple U.S. Embassy Country Teams.

He previously worked as the Global Programme Coordinator for the International Save the Children Alliance Secretariat and as a Country Director and Health Sector Coordinator for
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Allan J. "Alonzo" Wind I need to find some good fiction titles to take my mind all the books this summer and autumn from the collapsing Trump presidency. I finished Rage jus…moreI need to find some good fiction titles to take my mind all the books this summer and autumn from the collapsing Trump presidency. I finished Rage just tonight, and am 93% done with Michael Cohen's book. We also listened on Audible to Mary Trump's book. And of course have gone through Philip Rucker's A Very Stable Genius and others. It's poisoned my mind. (less)
Allan J. "Alonzo" Wind I think it really comes down to discipline and setting up the undisturbed time in the first part of the day to write write write - without editing at …moreI think it really comes down to discipline and setting up the undisturbed time in the first part of the day to write write write - without editing at all at first. Worry about that later. I've had it preached to me to write for 25 minute long Pomodoro blocs of time, without interruption. Get up, walk around, then set a timer and do it again. Results add up, hopefully.(less)
Average rating: 4.67 · 3 ratings · 3 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
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No Bumper Stickers

My wife pointed out something to me yesterday that I had not picked up on before. Have you noticed that there are far fewer bumper stickers around compared to past elections? This is true whether on the Republican or the Democratic sides. Yard signs and other sorts of signs of course are still out there - although they seem a bit reduced too. But bumper stickers at least in Virginia are now very r Read more of this blog post »
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Published on October 22, 2020 06:30 Tags: bumperstickers-realclearpolitics

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Allan’s Recent Updates

Allan Wind is 14% done with SuperLife
SuperLife by Darin Olien
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Allan Wind is 60% done with Compromised
Compromised by Peter Strzok
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Shade by Pete Souza
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Gorgeous and Brilliant

Fantastic book I had to get and leaf through after last night's documentary with Pete Souza: "The Way I Saw It." Thank you Pete and thank you always President Obama.
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The Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson
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Shade by Pete Souza
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Gorgeous and Brilliant

Fantastic book I had to get and leaf through after last night's documentary with Pete Souza: "The Way I Saw It." Thank you Pete and thank you always President Obama.
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Bring the War Home by Kathleen Belew
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Valuable but disappointing

This is a useful historical work but not what I expected. It focuses on the key 20 year buildup of right wing extremists and terrorists before the bombing of the OK City Federal Building, casting a.detailed light on the deve
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More of Allan's books…
Naomi Oreskes
“Western scientists built an intellectual culture based on the premise that it was worse to fool oneself into believing in something that did not exist than not to believe in something that did.”
Naomi Oreskes, The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future

Naomi Oreskes
“By the early 2000s, dangerous anthropogenic interference in the climate system was under way. Fires, floods, hurricanes, and heat waves began to intensify. Still, these effects were discounted.”
Naomi Oreskes, The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future

Naomi Oreskes
“Science fiction writers construct an imaginary future; historians attempt to reconstruct the past. Ultimately, both are seeking to understand the present. In this essay, we blend the two genres to imagine a future historian looking back on a past that is our present and (possible) future. The occasion is the tercentenary of the end of Western culture (1540–2093); the dilemma being addressed is how we—the children of the Enlightenment—failed to act on robust information about climate change and knowledge of the damaging events that were about to unfold. Our historian concludes that a second Dark Age had fallen on Western civilization, in which denial and self-deception, rooted in an ideological fixation on “free” markets, disabled the world’s powerful nations in the face of tragedy. Moreover, the scientists who best understood the problem were hamstrung by their own cultural practices, which demanded an excessively stringent standard for accepting claims of any kind—even those involving imminent threats. Here, our future historian, living in the Second People’s Republic of China, recounts the events of the Period of the Penumbra (1988–2093) that led to the Great Collapse and Mass Migration (2073–2093).”
Naomi Oreskes, The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future

Kim Stanley Robinson
“The Earth is bathed in a flood of sunlight. A fierce inundation of photons—on average, 342 joules per second per square meter. 4185 joules (one calorie) will raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree Celsius. If all this energy were captured by the Earth’s atmosphere, its temperature would rise by ten degrees Celsius in one day. Luckily much of it radiates back to space. How much depends on albedo and the chemical composition of the atmosphere, both of which vary over time. A good portion of Earth’s albedo, or reflectivity, is created by its polar ice caps. If polar ice and snow were to shrink significantly, more solar energy would stay on Earth. Sunlight would penetrate oceans previously covered by ice, and warm the water. This would add heat and melt more ice, in a positive feedback loop.”
Kim Stanley Robinson, Forty Signs of Rain

Kim Stanley Robinson
“Yeah, hey you know carbon sinks are so crucial, scrubbing CO2 out of the air may eventually turn out to be our only option, so maybe we should reverse those two clauses. Make carbon sinks come first and the climate-neutral power plants second in that paragraph.” “You think?” “Yes. Definitely. Carbon sinks could be the only way that our kids, and about a thousand years’ worth of kids actually, can save themselves from living in Swamp World. From living their whole lives on Venus.”
Kim Stanley Robinson, Forty Signs of Rain




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