Elizabeth Wayland Barber


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Barber received her PhD university from Yale in 1968.

Average rating: 4.26 · 2,270 ratings · 314 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
Women's Work: The First 20,...

4.37 avg rating — 1,060 ratings — published 1994 — 5 editions
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The Mummies of Ürümchi

4.16 avg rating — 287 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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When They Severed Earth fro...

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4.24 avg rating — 266 ratings — published 2004 — 6 editions
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The Dancing Goddesses: Folk...

4.25 avg rating — 92 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Prehistoric Textiles: The D...

4.57 avg rating — 68 ratings — published 1991 — 2 editions
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Resplendent Dress from Sout...

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Archaeological Decipherment...

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The Bog People: Iron-Age Ma...

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4.04 avg rating — 563 ratings — published 1965 — 15 editions
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Two Thoughts with but a Sin...

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“Come, let us weave a plan!”
Elizabeth Wayland Barber, Women's Work: The First 20,000 Years Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times

“Greek loom weight showing an owl spinning wool. The”
Elizabeth Wayland Barber, Women's Work: The First 20,000 Years Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times

“Once upon a time an Athenian princesss named Prokne was wed to Tereus, king of the barbarous Thracians of the north. When Prokne's unfortunate sister, Philomela, came for a visit, Tereus fell madly in love with the girl locked her away and raped her, then cut out her tongue to prevent her from telling anyone of the crime. Philomela, however, wove into a cloth the story of her misfortune. When Prokne, receiving the cloth, understood what had befallen, she freed her sister, killed her own son, Itys, whom she had borne to Tereus, and served the child up to his father at a feast--the vilest revenge she could think of. When Tereus discovered the truth, in wrath he pursued the two sisters, thinking to kill them, but the gods transformed all three into birds: Tereus into the hoopoe (a large, crested bird with a daggerlike beak), Philomela into the swallow, which can only twitter unintelligibly, and Prokne into the nightingale, which spends the night singing 'Itys Itys!' in mourning for her dead son. All these birds have reddish spots, it is said, from getting spattered with the blood of the child.
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It is interesting in our purposes because it shows in yet another way the great importance that clothmaking had in women's lives, becoming central to their mythology as well.”
Elizabeth Wayland Barber, Women's Work: The First 20,000 Years: Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times

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Pick-a-Shelf: 2011-03 - Mythology - What will you read in March? 37 100 Mar 16, 2011 03:51PM  
The Life of a Boo...: ♠ keres : 2016 Reading Challenge ♠ 24 69 Jan 26, 2016 11:46AM  
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Ultimate Popsugar...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Week 27: 6/30 - 7/6 72 125 Jul 19, 2017 12:36AM  
2019 Reading Chal...: 3rd Quarter - Wonders of the World 170 305 Oct 06, 2017 07:12AM  
Ultimate Popsugar...: Week 41: 10/6 – 10/12 65 112 Oct 21, 2017 08:05PM  
Around the Year i...: 12: A book based on a myth 73 269 Nov 08, 2017 06:01PM  
Around the Year i...: When They Severed Earth from Sky, by Elizabeth Wayland Barber 1 9 Nov 10, 2017 05:34PM  


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