Charles L. Whitfield

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Charles L. Whitfield


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Charles L. Whitfield, M.D., is a physician, psychotherapist, author and internationally recognized expert on mental illness, behavioral problems, and recovery from addiction and trauma. He was on the faculty of the Rutgers University Summer Institute of Alcohol and Drug Studies from 1978 through 2003, and in private practice of addiction medicine and psychotherapy since 1976. He has also been a consultant and collaborator at the CDC in Atlanta since 1998. He has been voted by his peers as one of the Best Doctors in America every year since 1993. He lives in Atlanta, GA, and is in private practice with his wife, author and therapist, Barbara Harris Whitfield.

Average rating: 4.08 · 5,843 ratings · 278 reviews · 31 distinct worksSimilar authors
Healing the Child Within: D...

4.09 avg rating — 5,155 ratings — published 1987 — 27 editions
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Boundaries and Relationship...

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3.91 avg rating — 354 ratings — published 1993 — 14 editions
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A Gift to Myself: A Persona...

4.15 avg rating — 143 ratings — published 1990 — 5 editions
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Co-Dependence Healing the H...

4.09 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 1991 — 4 editions
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Memory and Abuse

3.97 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1995 — 7 editions
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The Power of Humility: Choo...

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4.24 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2006 — 5 editions
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Wisdom To Know The Differen...

4.44 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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The Truth About Depression:...

3.79 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2003 — 6 editions
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My Recovery: A Personal Pla...

4.18 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2003 — 5 editions
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Timeless Troubadours: The M...

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2.73 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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More books by Charles L. Whitfield…
Quotes by Charles L. Whitfield  (?)
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“By choosing recovery and risking to be real, we set the healthy boundaries that say, "I am in charge of my recovery and my life, and no one else on this Earth is.”
Charles L. Whitfield, Boundaries and Relationships, Knowing, Protecting and Enjoying the Self

“Cermak said, “Those therapists who work successfully with this population have learned to honor the client’s need to keep a lid on his or her feelings. The most effective therapeutic process involves swinging back and forth between uncovering feelings and covering them again, and it is precisely this ability to modulate their feelings that PTSD clients have lost. They must feel secure that their ability to close their emotions down will never be taken away from them, but instead will be honored as an important tool for living. The initial goal of therapy here is to help clients move more freely into their feelings with the assurance that they can find distance from them again if they begin to be overwhelmed. Once children from chemically dependent homes, adult children of alcoholics, and other PTSD clients become confident that you are not going to strip them of their survival mechanisms, they are more likely to allow their feelings to emerge, if only for a moment. And that moment will be a start.” (58)”
Charles L. Whitfield, Healing the Child Within: Discovery and Recovery for Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families

“Simos said, “Grief work must be shared. In sharing, however, there must be no impatience, censure or boredom with the repetition, because repetition is necessary for catharsis and internalization and eventual unconscious acceptance of the reality of the loss. The bereaved are sensitive to the feelings of others and will not only refrain from revealing feelings to those they consider unequal to the burden of sharing the grief but may even try to comfort the helpers.” (97)”
Charles L. Whitfield, Healing the Child Within: Discovery and Recovery for Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families



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