John H. Westerhoff III





John H. Westerhoff III



Average rating: 4.01 · 251 ratings · 23 reviews · 30 distinct works
Will Our Children Have Faith?

3.94 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 1976 — 8 editions
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A People Called Episcopalia...

4.26 avg rating — 72 ratings — published 2002 — 4 editions
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Spiritual Life: The Foundat...

3.68 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 1994
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McGuffey and His Readers: P...

3.90 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1978 — 2 editions
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Living Faithfully as a Pray...

3.50 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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A Pilgrim People: Learning ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2004 — 4 editions
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Bringing Up Children in the...

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1980 — 2 editions
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Holy Baptism: A Guide for P...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2002
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Inner growth, outer change:...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1979
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Liturgy And Learning Throug...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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“Those who created the structure of the Episcopal Church were, in many cases, the same individuals who had framed and adopted the Constitution of the United States only a few years earlier, so it is not surprising that our structure is very similar.”
John H. Westerhoff III, A People Called Episcopalians: A Brief Introduction to Our Way of Life, Revised Edition

“Hooker argued that while the Scriptures are to be our primary source of authority, they are not to be isolated from reason and tradition. Why? Because God communicated his revelation as contained in the Scriptures in a manner sensitive to the specific needs of a specific group in a specific time in history and, therefore, intended that they be interpreted to make sense to a different people in a different time. God’s revelation was, therefore, to be both inside and outside of the Scriptures, guarded and guided by the Holy Spirit. The Scriptures are intended, Hooker asserted, to be a living word and not a collection of dead letters. That is, the Scriptures (and tradition) are not self-explanatory but require the use of reason to determine their meaning. Reason, of course, is not autonomous or individualistic. Nor are there three different authorities. Rather, there is a single authority composed of three intersecting sources: the Scriptures being the normative authoritative source; reason and tradition being necessary interpretive authoritative sources.”
John H. Westerhoff III, A People Called Episcopalians: A Brief Introduction to Our Way of Life, Revised Edition

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John H. Westerhoff III, A People Called Episcopalians: A Brief Introduction to Our Way of Life, Revised Edition



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