Joanne Rossmassler Fritz

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Joanne Rossmassler Fritz

Goodreads Author


Born
Philadelphia, The United States
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Member Since
July 2009


Joanne Rossmassler Fritz was lucky enough to grow up near Philadelphia, surrounded by books and classical music She has worked in a publishing company, a school library and an Indie bookstore. Joanne started writing in school, but didn't get serious about it until she survived her first brain aneurysm rupture in 2005. She joined SCBWI and kept writing. Her second brain aneurysm rupture in 2017 was worse than the first, but she persevered. Her debut MG novel in verse, EVERYWHERE BLUE, is out now from Holiday House.
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Average rating: 4.45 · 153 ratings · 56 reviews · 1 distinct workSimilar authors
Everywhere Blue

4.45 avg rating — 153 ratings — published 2021 — 3 editions
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Somewhere Between...
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by Laekan Zea Kemp (Goodreads Author)
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Everywhere Blue by Joanne Rossmassler Fritz
"Liked the lyrical writing. Love the strong characters."
Everywhere Blue by Joanne Rossmassler Fritz
"Maddie's brother, Strum is missing. He seems to have just walked away from his college in Colorado, but no one knows where he went. Maddie and Strum were extremely close, so she takes his disappearance very hard. She starts to look for clues into his" Read more of this review »
Everywhere Blue by Joanne Rossmassler Fritz
"Well, it's not perfect but it's pretty damn unique. A complex family (and really, aren't we all) deals with the disappearance of the older college-age brother who has battled with his climate change denying father. All the children have glorious musi" Read more of this review »
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Rajani LaRocca shared a note and highlight from
Red, White, and Whole by Rajani LaRocca
Moon, he says. That’s what Amma is named after. Moon, I repeat. Amma takes my hand, points at tiny sparkles strewn like bright pebbles in the darkness. Star, she says. That’s what Reha is named after. Star, I repeat. Which one? Amma holds my arms apart All of them, Reha. and I embrace the field of light.
The metaphor of the mother as the moon and daughter as a star was one I knew I wanted to include when I first started writing this story. The night sky binds all of us together, no matter where we're from. And Reha's parents want her to know they want the whole world to be open to her — all kinds of possibilities.
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Red, White, and Whole by Rajani LaRocca
Red, White, and Whole Amma works in the Hematology lab at the hospital. She spins the blood and counts the cells in the Complete Blood Count. She counts the red cells, that carry oxygen, the platelets, that stop bleeding, and the white cells, the warriors protecting us from invaders. At least if they’re doing what they’re supposed to do. Cells and plasma together are called whole blood, which is what flows inside us. Red, white, and whole, the precious river in our arteries, our veins, our hearts.
This is another central metaphor in the book which is brought to life so beautifully in the cover. Red, white, and whole -- reflecting the components of blood, the different meanings of red and white in American culture, and the colors of the American flag.
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Rajani LaRocca shared a note and highlight from
Red, White, and Whole by Rajani LaRocca
God is everywhere, says Amma. He is in every living creature. God has many faces, many forms, male and female, human and animal, and forms we cannot imagine. This is why we do not hurt people, or harm animals. Why we do not eat meat. God’s wisdom is in paper and books. So we do not disrespect them or touch them with our feet. God is everywhere. And I believe it, because I hear God in Daddy’s humming as he shaves, feel God in Daddy’s kiss good night, smell God in the silk of Amma’s sari, see God reflected in her shining eyes, and taste God in the spicy, sweet, piping hot food we eat together.
I knew how I wanted to end the book before I wrote it, and I knew it would echo this poem.
Joanne rated a book it was amazing
The Canyon's Edge by Dusti Bowling
The Canyon's Edge
by Dusti Bowling (Goodreads Author)
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Powerful novel in verse, which is actually a hybrid -- the opening chapters and closing chapter are in prose, so they're bookending the verse. It works well! The writing is masterful. Each word counts and I admired the author's word choices. I couldn ...more
Joanne liked a quote
A Place to Hang the Moon by Kate Albus
“The librarian chuckled. “I suppose there are rather a lot of orphan stories out there.” “Why do grown-ups write so many of them?” William asked. “I hadn’t really thought about it,” Mrs. Müller confessed. “Perhaps they think children fancy the notion of living on their own, without adults to tell them what to do. It’s quite daft, if you think about it, isn’t it?”
Kate Albus
Joanne liked a quote
A Place to Hang the Moon by Kate Albus
“Besides which, I really ought to send her a book instead. Though she’s not much of a reader.” She paused. “Evidence as to her character.”
Kate Albus
More of Joanne's books…
Kate Albus
“Fibs, you must know, are entirely acceptable when they serve the purpose of getting one to the library.”
Kate Albus, A Place to Hang the Moon

Kate Albus
“Besides which, I really ought to send her a book instead. Though she’s not much of a reader.” She paused. “Evidence as to her character.”
Kate Albus, A Place to Hang the Moon

Kate Albus
“The librarian chuckled. “I suppose there are rather a lot of orphan stories out there.” “Why do grown-ups write so many of them?” William asked. “I hadn’t really thought about it,” Mrs. Müller confessed. “Perhaps they think children fancy the notion of living on their own, without adults to tell them what to do. It’s quite daft, if you think about it, isn’t it?”
Kate Albus, A Place to Hang the Moon

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