Matthew Skelton

Goodreads Author


Member Since
November 2019


Average rating: 4.28 · 666 ratings · 85 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
Team Topologies: Organizing...

by
4.29 avg rating — 720 ratings — published 2019 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Better Whiteboard Sketches

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Team Guide to Software Oper...

by
it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Database Lifecycle Management

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Matthew’s Recent Updates

Team Topologies by Matthew    Skelton
"The authors evolve the idea behind DevOps Topologies into a model for or organisational design. They suggest four essential team types and three interaction models, and present multiple real cases where their approach was used. From that perspective," Read more of this review »
Team Topologies by Matthew    Skelton
"A must read for anyone designing teams, architecture or org structure.

The ideas around fundamental topologies and patterns, cognitive load and interaction types; are vital concepts beautifully captured by Matthew and Manuel.

Highly recommended" Read more of this review »
More of Matthew's books…
“An obsession with “feature delivery” ignores the human-related and team-related dynamics inherent in modern software, leading to a lack of engagement from staff, especially when the cognitive load is exceeded.”
Matthew Skelton, Team Topologies: Organizing Business and Technology Teams for Fast Flow

“Conway’s law tells us that we need to understand what software architecture is needed before we organize our teams, otherwise the communication paths and incentives in the organization will end up dictating the software architecture. As Michael Nygard says: “Team assignments are the first draft of the architecture.”7”
Matthew Skelton, Team Topologies: Organizing Business and Technology Teams for Fast Flow

“Loose coupling—components do not hold strong dependencies on other components ​•​High cohesion—components have clearly bounded responsibilities, and their internal elements are strongly related ​•​Clear and appropriate version compatibility ​•​Clear and appropriate cross-team testing”
Matthew Skelton, Team Topologies: Organizing Business and Technology Teams for Fast Flow




No comments have been added yet.