Mary-Lou Weisman

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Mary-Lou Weisman

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Author Mary-Lou Weisman began her career as a journalist and columnist for the New York Times, to which she contributed many travel essays. Between 1998 and 2004 she served as a contributing commentator on Public Radio International's “Savvy Traveler,” and wrote a feature length film for Paramount Pictures. Her first book, Intensive Care: A Family Love Story (Random House) was called “a classic” by New Republic reviewer Maggie Scarf and her best-selling second book, My (Middle Aged) Baby Book (Workman Publishing) was endorsed by Erma Bombeck as "A perfect gift for middle agers and those in denial." Mary-Lou's collected essays, Traveling While Married (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill) brought a comparison to Bombeck from The Philadelphia Inqu ...more

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Mary-Lou Weisman If I precede my writing time with vigorous physical exercise, I find that thoughts and words come more easily. If I'm in the midst of a book and…moreIf I precede my writing time with vigorous physical exercise, I find that thoughts and words come more easily. If I'm in the midst of a book and writing fluidly, I make a point NOT to finish my thoughts. I make quick notes about where I'm heading so that when I next sit down to write, I already know where I'm going. (less)
Mary-Lou Weisman Well, there's always the advantage of staying in my PJs all day. But what's really best is when I'm writing well lose all sense of time. Some people…moreWell, there's always the advantage of staying in my PJs all day. But what's really best is when I'm writing well lose all sense of time. Some people call this the alpha state. It's when my passion for writing is matched by the quality of the writing.(less)
Average rating: 3.63 · 356 ratings · 78 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Traveling While Married

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3.26 avg rating — 155 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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3.86 avg rating — 139 ratings — published 2010 — 6 editions
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Playing House in Provence: ...

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My Middle-Aged Baby Book: A...

4.25 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2013
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My Middle-Aged Baby Book: A...

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3.40 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1995
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Intensive Care: A Family Lo...

3.44 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1984 — 3 editions
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My Middle Age Baby Book

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liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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My Baby Boomer Baby Book: A...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2006
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“Just deciding where to go on vacation can often test the marriage’s flexibility. One partner wants to do something physical and adventurous, like trying to outrun molten lava down a volcano; the other prefers something more restful, even spiritual, like raking gravel in a Buddhist monastery.”
Mary-Lou Weisman, Traveling While Married

“The sole cause of man’s unhappiness,” Pascal wrote in his Pensées, “is that he does not know how to stay quietly in his room.” If we were not tempted to venture out, we would never have to experience the disappointments inherent in travel: that arch is not so triumphant; that tower’s not so leaning; that Mona’s not so Lisa. The fault is not in the three-star sights but in ourselves, that we are the same underlings we were when we were at home–just as prone to boredom, anxiety, and petty thoughts, in spite of the radical change of scene. I can be just as unhappy in front of the rose window at Chartres as I am at my kitchen sink. In fact, I can be more unhappy because I believe I should be happier. The”
Mary-Lou Weisman, Traveling While Married




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