Edward Sapir


Born
in Germany
January 26, 1884

Died
February 04, 1939

Genre


Edward Sapir was born in Pomerania, Germany, in 1884, and came to the United States at the age of five. He first made his reputation as an expert on languages of the Native American. He taught at the University of Chicago and later at Yale, and was one of the first to explore the relations between language studies and anthropology. He died in 1939. Language, first published in 1921, is his only full-length book for a general audience. He published a great many articles and some verse in periodicals.

Average rating: 3.87 · 470 ratings · 35 reviews · 67 distinct worksSimilar authors
Language: An Introduction t...

3.84 avg rating — 301 ratings — published 1921 — 83 editions
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Culture, Language, and Pers...

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3.85 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1949 — 7 editions
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The Collected Works of Edwa...

4.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1999
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Linguaggio e relatività

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings
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The Collected Works of Edwa...

4.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1990 — 4 editions
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The Psychology of Culture: ...

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3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1993 — 5 editions
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The Symbolic Role of Animal...

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4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1995
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Sapir, Edward: The Collecte...

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4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2008 — 9 editions
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Anthropologie

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1967
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The Collected Works of Edwa...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings12 editions
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More books by Edward Sapir…
“Language is the most massive and inclusive art we know, a mountainous and anonymous work of unconscious generations.”
Edward Sapir, Language: an Introduction to the Study of Speech

“What fetters the mind and benumbs the spirit is ever the dogged acceptance of absolutes.”
Edward Sapir, Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech

“The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached ... We see and hear and otherwise experience very largely as we do because the language habits of our community predispose certain choices of interpretation.”
Edward Sapir