Jeane Westin

Jeane Westin


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Jeane Westin's professional writing career began with a humourous camping disaster article for her local newspaper. National newspaper and magazine articles followed until she moved on to non-fiction books and then to long hardback historical novels. Jeane's second novel, 'Swing Sisters' came out of her youthful love of jazz, the major record collections she carted about the country and from wondering what women's role was during the early years of that special American music.

Average rating: 3.86 · 2,774 ratings · 149 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Virgin's Daughters: In ...

3.94 avg rating — 1,714 ratings — published 2009 — 6 editions
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His Last Letter: Elizabeth ...

3.85 avg rating — 699 ratings — published 2010 — 7 editions
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The Spymaster's Daughter

3.14 avg rating — 118 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Lady Anne's Dangerous Man (...

3.36 avg rating — 74 ratings — published 2006 — 3 editions
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Love and Glory

4.25 avg rating — 65 ratings — published 1985 — 5 editions
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Lady Katherne's Wild Ride (...

3.28 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2006 — 3 editions
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Lady Merry's Dashing Champi...

3.33 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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Swing Sisters

3.86 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1991 — 2 editions
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The Abbey And The Hall

4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2014
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Making Do

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2012
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More books by Jeane Westin…
Lady Anne's Dangerous Man Lady Katherne's Wild Ride Lady Merry's Dashing Champion
(3 books)
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3.34 avg rating — 149 ratings

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“The Tudors hated to be wrong, and therefore never were.”
Jeane Westin, His Last Letter: Elizabeth I and the Earl of Leicester

“Pain was the only sign to her that she was alive and could feel emotion.”
Jeane Westin, His Last Letter: Elizabeth I and the Earl of Leicester

“She had been born knowing that boldness erased fear, while cowardice invited it and earned her only more ill treatment. No matter how she shook with dread in private, she would never show fear before her questioners or her guards. In men's minds fear was a certain mark of guilt.”
Jeane Westin, His Last Letter: Elizabeth I and the Earl of Leicester



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