Paul Bogard

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Paul Bogard

Goodreads Author


Born
Minneapolis, The United States
Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
August 2013


Born and raised in Minnesota, I have lived in Minneapolis, Albuquerque, Reno, northern Wisconsin, Winston-Salem, and now Harrisonburg, Virginia. Ah, the academic life.

I have a wonderful dog named Luna, a Brittany who is nearly 15. Her favorite place to live was Reno. Dog heaven, she says.

Every summer, we leave wherever we are and drive to New Mexico and Nevada to see old friends and walk old walks. Then we head to northern Minnesota for a few weeks. My family has a cabin on a lake there, and so I grew up standing out on our dock, or lying back in a canoe, watching the Milky Way bend from one horizon to the other. That's probably where my book The End of Night was first inspired.

Pizza, the color green, autumn. Things I love.

Average rating: 3.94 · 1,449 ratings · 304 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
The End of Night: Searching...

3.95 avg rating — 1,323 ratings — published 2013 — 21 editions
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The Ground Beneath Us: From...

3.85 avg rating — 89 ratings4 editions
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Let There Be Night: Testimo...

3.97 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 2008 — 3 editions
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La tierra bajo nosotros

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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The World Atlas of Light Po...

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More books by Paul Bogard…

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Flight Behavior
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The End of Night by Paul Bogard
"At night, I have learned to notice. Through my little radio, through my time outside, I have learned that the natural sounds of night are solitary, singled out, floating. Sometimes they seem meant only for me.

Stars don't rest at night, neither do...

" Read more of this review »
Paul Bogard liked a quote
The End of Night by Paul Bogard
“Most days I live awed by the world we have still, rather than mourning the worlds we have lost. The bandit mask of a cedar waxwing on a bare branch a few feet away; the clear bright sun of a frozen winter noon; the rise of Orion in the eastern evening sky-every day, every night, I give thanks for another chance to notice. I see beauty everywhere; so much beauty I often speak it aloud. So much beauty I often laugh, and my day is made.
Still if you wanted to, I think, you could feel sadness without end. I’m not even talking about hungry children or domestic violence or endless wars between supposedly grown men…but ‘you mustn’t be frightened if a sadness rises in front of you, larger than any you even seen,' said Rilke, 'you must realize that something is happening to you, that life has not forgotten you, that it holds you in it hand and will not let you fall.”
Paul Bogard
Paul Bogard has read
Empire of Vines by Erica Hannickel
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Paul Bogard rated a book really liked it
Gettysburg by Allen C. Guelzo
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I enjoyed this book a lot. It made me want to go back to Gettysburg as soon as possible and revisit the places where this battle happened. For a very long book it was easy to read, and it kept my interest. My complaints are small--I found the "maps" ...more
Paul Bogard liked a quote
The End of Night by Paul Bogard
“I had travelled from Spain into Morocco and from there south to the Atlas Mountains, at the edge of the Sahara Desert…one night, in a youth hostel that was more like a stable, I woke and walked out into a snowstorm. But it wasn’t the snow I was used to in Minnesota, or anywhere else I had been. Standing bare chest to cool night, wearing flip-flops and shorts, I let a storm of stars swirl around me. I remember no light pollution, heck, I remember no lights. But I remember the light around me-the sense of being lit by starlight- and that I could see the ground to which the stars seemed to be floating down. I saw the sky that night in three dimensions- the sky had depth, some stars seemingly close and some much farther away, the Milky Way so well defined it had what astronomers call “structure”, that sense of its twisting depths. I remember stars from one horizon to another, making a night sky so plush it still seems like a dream.
It was a time in my life when I was every day experiencing
...more
Paul Bogard
Paul Bogard rated a book it was amazing
SuperPuppy by Peter J.  Vollmer
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This is a GREAT dog training book. Inexpensive, comprehensive, excellent. I can't recommend it too highly.

I found this book some 15 years ago when I first brought home my new puppy, a new Brittany I named Luna. I'd looked all around at the different
...more
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Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver
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Paul Bogard is currently reading
Gettysburg by Allen C. Guelzo
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Paul Bogard made a comment on his review of Matterhorn
Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes
" I read this two summers ago, and I still think of it all the time. For me, the Vietnam war was a national tragedy: the destruction of a foreign land a ...more "
More of Paul's books…
“Most days I live awed by the world we have still, rather than mourning the worlds we have lost. The bandit mask of a cedar waxwing on a bare branch a few feet away; the clear bright sun of a frozen winter noon; the rise of Orion in the eastern evening sky-every day, every night, I give thanks for another chance to notice. I see beauty everywhere; so much beauty I often speak it aloud. So much beauty I often laugh, and my day is made.
Still if you wanted to, I think, you could feel sadness without end. I’m not even talking about hungry children or domestic violence or endless wars between supposedly grown men…but ‘you mustn’t be frightened if a sadness rises in front of you, larger than any you even seen,' said Rilke, 'you must realize that something is happening to you, that life has not forgotten you, that it holds you in it hand and will not let you fall.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light

“I had travelled from Spain into Morocco and from there south to the Atlas Mountains, at the edge of the Sahara Desert…one night, in a youth hostel that was more like a stable, I woke and walked out into a snowstorm. But it wasn’t the snow I was used to in Minnesota, or anywhere else I had been. Standing bare chest to cool night, wearing flip-flops and shorts, I let a storm of stars swirl around me. I remember no light pollution, heck, I remember no lights. But I remember the light around me-the sense of being lit by starlight- and that I could see the ground to which the stars seemed to be floating down. I saw the sky that night in three dimensions- the sky had depth, some stars seemingly close and some much farther away, the Milky Way so well defined it had what astronomers call “structure”, that sense of its twisting depths. I remember stars from one horizon to another, making a night sky so plush it still seems like a dream.
It was a time in my life when I was every day experiencing something new. I felt open to everything, as though I was made of clay, and the world was imprinting on me its breathtaking beauty (and terrible reality.) Standing nearly naked under that Moroccan sky, skin against the air, the dark, the stars, the night pressed its impression, and my lifelong connection was sealed.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light

“In these countless stars, in their clusters and colors and constellations, in the “shooting” showers of blazing dust and ice, we have always found beauty. And in this beauty, the overwhelming size of the universe has seemed less ominous, earth’s own beauty more incredible. If indeed the numbers and distances of the night sky are so large that they become nearly meaningless, then let us find the meaning under our feet.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light

Topics Mentioning This Author

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“Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?”
Mary Oliver

“In these countless stars, in their clusters and colors and constellations, in the “shooting” showers of blazing dust and ice, we have always found beauty. And in this beauty, the overwhelming size of the universe has seemed less ominous, earth’s own beauty more incredible. If indeed the numbers and distances of the night sky are so large that they become nearly meaningless, then let us find the meaning under our feet.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light

“With my naked eye, on nights the moon climbs slowly, sometimes so dusted with rust and rose, brown, and gold tones that it nearly drips earth colors and seems intimately braided with Earth, it feels close, part of this world, a friend. But through the telescope, the moon seems- ironically- farther away…the gray-white moon in a sea of black, its surface in crisp relief, brighter than ever before. I am struck too, by the scene’s absolute silence.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light

“I had travelled from Spain into Morocco and from there south to the Atlas Mountains, at the edge of the Sahara Desert…one night, in a youth hostel that was more like a stable, I woke and walked out into a snowstorm. But it wasn’t the snow I was used to in Minnesota, or anywhere else I had been. Standing bare chest to cool night, wearing flip-flops and shorts, I let a storm of stars swirl around me. I remember no light pollution, heck, I remember no lights. But I remember the light around me-the sense of being lit by starlight- and that I could see the ground to which the stars seemed to be floating down. I saw the sky that night in three dimensions- the sky had depth, some stars seemingly close and some much farther away, the Milky Way so well defined it had what astronomers call “structure”, that sense of its twisting depths. I remember stars from one horizon to another, making a night sky so plush it still seems like a dream.
It was a time in my life when I was every day experiencing something new. I felt open to everything, as though I was made of clay, and the world was imprinting on me its breathtaking beauty (and terrible reality.) Standing nearly naked under that Moroccan sky, skin against the air, the dark, the stars, the night pressed its impression, and my lifelong connection was sealed.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light

“Most days I live awed by the world we have still, rather than mourning the worlds we have lost. The bandit mask of a cedar waxwing on a bare branch a few feet away; the clear bright sun of a frozen winter noon; the rise of Orion in the eastern evening sky-every day, every night, I give thanks for another chance to notice. I see beauty everywhere; so much beauty I often speak it aloud. So much beauty I often laugh, and my day is made.
Still if you wanted to, I think, you could feel sadness without end. I’m not even talking about hungry children or domestic violence or endless wars between supposedly grown men…but ‘you mustn’t be frightened if a sadness rises in front of you, larger than any you even seen,' said Rilke, 'you must realize that something is happening to you, that life has not forgotten you, that it holds you in it hand and will not let you fall.”
Paul Bogard, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light




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