Paul D. Escott


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Paul D. Escott earned his B.A. degree cum laude from Harvard College and his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University. He taught at UNC Charlotte before coming to Wake Forest University, where he served for nine years as Dean of the College. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, has received fellowships from the Whitney Young, Jr., Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, and twice won an award for the best non-fiction book published by a resident of North Carolina.

Average rating: 3.73 · 212 ratings · 24 reviews · 26 distinct worksSimilar authors
Major Problems in the Histo...

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4.17 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1990 — 3 editions
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After Secession: Jefferson ...

3.56 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1978 — 2 editions
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Major Problems in the Histo...

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3.56 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1999
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Many Excellent People: Powe...

3.93 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1985 — 4 editions
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Slavery Remembered: A Recor...

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1979 — 5 editions
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"What Shall We Do with the ...

3.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2009 — 3 editions
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The South for New Southerners

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1991 — 3 editions
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North Carolinians in the Er...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2008 — 4 editions
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Uncommonly Savage: Civil Wa...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2014 — 5 editions
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The Worst Passions of Human...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings3 editions
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More books by Paul D. Escott…
“All wars leave a legacy of bitterness and hatred, but internecine conflicts create the deepest scars. There is something different about such intrafamilial conflicts. People who once were part of one national family divide, define each other as the hateful enemy, and aim for the jugular. On both sides of an internecine conflict there is a feeling of betrayal, a sense that those who were brothers or sisters have been traitorous to their commitments or to the nation [1].”
Paul D. Escott, Uncommonly Savage: Civil War and Remembrance in Spain and the United States

“War cannot eliminate differing ideas and viewpoints, and partisans of the defeated side do not disappear. Though subjugated, they become a sizable political constituency in the postwar period. A dictator may be able to repress them, and in democracies a numerical majority may outvote them, but neither can change their thoughts. Since civil wars are, by nature, deep and fundamental conflicts, the competition between the views that led to war is likely to resurface. The defeated side may be chastened or subdued, but its values and ways of seeing the world reappear, in some form, in politics [107].”
Paul D. Escott, Uncommonly Savage: Civil War and Remembrance in Spain and the United States

“What southern whites further sought, and in a sense demanded, was respect. This the North provided after 1876 in paeans to the courage and dedication of soldiers on both sides. Resentment of northern power, the war’s destruction, and Reconstruction continued to be strong in the South, and the work of white-supremacist politicians, army veterans, and southern women turned that resentment into a long-lasting ideology of the Lost Cause. Northerners, for their part, congratulated themselves on winning the war and freeing the slaves; they also took pleasure in feeling superior to the South for many generations, while industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and other social changes diverted much of their attention from wartime issues [184].”
Paul D. Escott, Uncommonly Savage: Civil War and Remembrance in Spain and the United States

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