David Macaulay

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David Macaulay


Born
in Lancashire, England, The United Kingdom
December 02, 1946

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David Macaulay, born in 1946, was eleven when his parents moved from England to Bloomfield, New Jersey. He found himself having to adjust from an idyllic English childhood to life in a fast paced American city. During this time he began to draw seriously, and after graduating from high school he enrolled in the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). After spending his fifth year at RISD in Rome on the European Honors Program, he received a bachelor’s degree in architecture and vowed never to practice. After working as an interior designer, a junior high school teacher, and a teacher at RISD, Macaulay began to experiment with creating books. He published his first book, Cathedral, in 1973. Following in this tradition, Macaulay created other b ...more

Average rating: 4.11 · 28,780 ratings · 2,851 reviews · 66 distinct worksSimilar authors
Black and White

3.77 avg rating — 4,588 ratings — published 1990 — 19 editions
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Castle

4.22 avg rating — 3,930 ratings — published 1977 — 29 editions
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The Way Things Work

4.35 avg rating — 2,648 ratings — published 1988 — 39 editions
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Cathedral: The Story of Its...

4.26 avg rating — 2,149 ratings — published 1973 — 32 editions
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The New Way Things Work

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4.26 avg rating — 1,988 ratings — published 1988 — 12 editions
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Motel of the Mysteries

4.11 avg rating — 2,051 ratings — published 1979 — 18 editions
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City: A Story of Roman Plan...

4.26 avg rating — 1,364 ratings — published 1974 — 29 editions
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Pyramid

4.18 avg rating — 1,303 ratings — published 1975 — 29 editions
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Underground

4.17 avg rating — 519 ratings — published 1976 — 15 editions
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The Way We Work: Getting to...

4.23 avg rating — 447 ratings — published 2008 — 13 editions
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More books by David Macaulay…
Cathedral: The Story of Its... Castle City: A Story of Roman Plan... Pyramid Underground Mosque Mill
(9 books)
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4.22 avg rating — 10,342 ratings

Jet Plane: How It Works Castle: How It Works Toilet: How It Works Eye: How It Works
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3.93 avg rating — 592 ratings

Quotes by David Macaulay  (?)
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“What I remember most clearly is how it felt. I’d just finished painting a red fire engine-like the one I often walked past near my grandparents’ house. Suddenly the teachers, whose names I've long forgotten, closed in on my desk. They seemed unusually impressed, and my still dripping fire engine was immediately and ceremoniously pinned up. I don’t know what they might have said, but their unexpected attention and having something I’d made given a place of honor on the wall created an overwhelming and totally unfamiliar sense of pride inside me. I loved that feeling, and I wanted to feel it again and again. That desire, I suppose, was the beginning of my career.
I have no idea where my fire engine painting ended up, but I never forgot the basic layout. Several decades later, it served as the inspiration for this sketch for an illustration in a book called Why the chicken crossed the Road.”
David Macaulay

“These amazing and often indispensable systems work so well and so quietly that we tend to be unaware of their existence.”
David Macaulay, Underground

“By 200 B.C. soldiers of the Roman Republic had conquered all of Italy except the Alps. In the following three hundred years they created an empire extending from Spain to the Persian Gulf. To insure their hold over these lands the Roman soldiers built permanent military camps. As the need for military force lessened, many camps became important cities of the Roman Empire. The Romans knew that well planned cities did more to maintain peace and security than twice the number of military camps. They also knew that a city was more than just a business, government, or religious center. It was all three, but most important, it had to be a place where people wanted to live.”
David Macaulay, City: A Story of Roman Planning and Construction



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