Gregory Berns


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Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University and Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology.

* Ph.D. University of California, Davis, 1990
* M.D. University of California, San Diego, 1994

Average rating: 3.9 · 6,940 ratings · 828 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
How Dogs Love Us: A Neurosc...

3.96 avg rating — 5,594 ratings — published 2013 — 15 editions
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Iconoclast: A Neuroscientis...

3.72 avg rating — 753 ratings — published 2008 — 8 editions
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What It's Like to Be a Dog:...

3.60 avg rating — 462 ratings — published 2017 — 12 editions
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Satisfaction: Sensation See...

3.59 avg rating — 123 ratings — published 2005 — 4 editions
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Neuromarketing: The Hope an...

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3.63 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2014
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“Normally, stress is lowest in the morning and rises steadily throughout the day. But the presence of dogs kept self-reported stress at their morning levels all day long. The researchers also found that the presence of dogs increased communication between workers.”
Gregory Berns, How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain

“The question of what a dog is thinking is actually an old metaphysical debate, which has its origins in Descartes’s famous saying cogito ergo sum—“I think, therefore I am.” Our entire human experience exists solely inside our heads. Photons may strike our retinas, but it is only through the activity of our brains that we have the subjective experience of seeing a rainbow or the sublime beauty of a sunset over the ocean. Does a dog see those things? Of course. Do they experience them the same way? Absolutely not.”
Gregory Berns, How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain

“Eventually, I came to the conclusion that the key to improving dog-human relationships is through social cognition, not behaviorism. Positive reinforcement is a shortcut to train dogs, but it is not necessarily the best way to form a relationship with them. To truly live with dogs, humans need to become “great leaders.” Not dictators who rule by doling out treats and by threatening punishment, but leaders who respect and value their dogs as sentient beings.”
Gregory Berns, How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain



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