James Hollis


Born
Springfield, Illinois, The United States
Website

Genre


James Hollis, Ph. D. is Executive Director of the Jung Center of Houston, TX, a practicing Jungian Analyst (psychotherapy developed by C.G. Jung - the eminent Swiss psychiatrist), and author of eleven books.

Average rating: 4.31 · 4,225 ratings · 452 reviews · 22 distinct worksSimilar authors
Finding Meaning in the Seco...

4.19 avg rating — 985 ratings — published 2005 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Middle Passage: From Mi...

4.46 avg rating — 539 ratings — published 1993 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Eden Project: In Search of ...

4.46 avg rating — 414 ratings — published 1998 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
What Matters Most: Living a...

4.26 avg rating — 428 ratings — published 2008 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Why Good People Do Bad Thin...

3.98 avg rating — 415 ratings — published 2007 — 11 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Swamplands of the Soul: New...

4.42 avg rating — 333 ratings — published 1996 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Under Saturn's Shadow: The ...

4.33 avg rating — 260 ratings — published 1994 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Creating a Life: Finding Yo...

4.43 avg rating — 147 ratings — published 2000
Rate this book
Clear rating
Hauntings: Dispelling the G...

4.43 avg rating — 199 ratings — published 2013 — 8 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Through the Dark Wood: Find...

4.49 avg rating — 109 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by James Hollis…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“We are not here to fit in, be well balanced, or provide exempla for others. We are here to be eccentric, different, perhaps strange, perhaps merely to add our small piece, our little clunky, chunky selves, to the great mosaic of being. As the gods intended, we are here to become more and more ourselves.”
James Hollis, What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life

“The capacity for growth depends on one’s ability to internalize and to take personal responsibility. If we forever see our life as a problem caused by others, a problem to be "solved," then no change will occur.”
James Hollis, The Middle Passage: From Misery to Meaning in Midlife

“When one has let go of that great hidden agenda that drives humanity and its varied histories, then one can begin to encounter the immensity of one's own soul. If we are courageous enough to say, "Not this person, nor any other, can ultimately give me what I want; only I can," then we are free to celebrate a relationship for what it can give.”
James Hollis, Eden Project: In Search of the Magical Other



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite James to Goodreads.