John Preston


Born
in Medfield, Massachusetts, The United States
December 11, 1945

Died
April 28, 1994

Website

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John Preston wrote and edited gay erotica, fiction, and nonfiction.
He grew up in Medfield, Massachusetts, later living in a number of major American cities before settling in Portland, Maine in 1979. A writer of fiction and nonfiction, dealing mostly with issues in gay life, he was a pioneer in the early gay rights movement in Minneapolis. He helped found one of the earliest gay community centers in the United States, edited two newsletters devoted to sexual health, and served as editor of The Advocate in 1975.

He was the author or editor of nearly fifty books, including such erotic landmarks as Mr. Benson and I Once Had a Master and Other Tales of Erotic Love. Other works include Franny, the Queen of Provincetown (first a novel, then
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Average rating: 3.9 · 1,275 ratings · 156 reviews · 129 distinct worksSimilar authors
Mr. Benson

3.86 avg rating — 423 ratings — published 1983 — 8 editions
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Flesh and the Word: An Anth...

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3.67 avg rating — 95 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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I Once Had a Master

4.23 avg rating — 71 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
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Franny, the Queen of Provin...

3.94 avg rating — 93 ratings — published 1983 — 4 editions
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The Love of a Master

3.96 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1987 — 3 editions
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Entertainment for a Master

3.76 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 1986 — 6 editions
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Hometowns

3.81 avg rating — 42 ratings — published 1991 — 2 editions
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In Search of a Master

3.97 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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My Life as a Pornographer &...

4.11 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 1993
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Member of the Family: Gay M...

3.91 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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More books by John Preston…
Sweet Dreams Golden Years Deadly Lies Stolen Moments Secret Dangers Lethal Silence
(6 books)
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3.88 avg rating — 64 ratings

“The way to get better pornography is to give pornographers better sex.”
John Preston, My Life as a Pornographer & Other Indecent Acts

“Where we come from is important to who we are….Do we sense that we fit? Do we feel welcome? Do we experience ourselves as valued members of the community? How are we perceived by our neighbors and peers? These are among the most fundamental questions we have to answer.

Most men begin with the promise that we are, in fact, welcome. The boy child is, in almost all our known contexts, the heir. He has a right to assume that he will acquire whatever is possible in his world. If his background includes being the member of a disenfranchised group because of race, religion, ethnic background, or class status, he still has the expectation of achieving the most that background will give him.

The gay man, since he is primarily a man, begins with those assumptions. It isn’t until he comes of age and understands his sexual identity and the way it separates him from his birth community that a gay man achieves a perception of being a member of this particular minority….

One of the first questions that a gay man has to answer revolves around the basic issue: Where do I belong? Having grown up as a privileged member of his community, he will now have to ask himself if he can stay there. For years, gay men thought they only had two choices: They could either sublimate their erotic identities and remain in their hometown, or they could move to large centers of population and lose themselves in anonymity. There was no way for a gay man to have a hometown and still be honest with himself. He had to hide his social and sexual proclivities, or else he had to give up communal life in pursuit of them.”
John Preston, Hometowns

“everything about him was brown - dark brown. His skin was mahogany-coloured. So were his clothes: a cotton tie, a tweed jacket with the top button fastened and what appeared to be a cardigan beneath. He was like a kipper in human form. It seemed absurd that his name should be Brown too.”
John Preston, The Dig, Large Print