Liz Fosslien

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Liz Fosslien

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Average rating: 4.05 · 2,118 ratings · 259 reviews · 2 distinct worksSimilar authors
No Hard Feelings: The Secre...

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4.05 avg rating — 2,123 ratings — published 2019 — 10 editions
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Le guide détendu des émotio...

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“Success depends on psychological safety. At Google, members of teams with high levels of psychological safety were less likely to leave their jobs, brought in more revenue, and were rated effective twice as often by executives. MIT researchers who studied team performance came to the same conclusion: simply grouping smart people together doesn’t guarantee a smart team. Online and off, the best teams discuss ideas frequently, do not let one person dominate the conversation, and are sensitive to one another’s feelings.”
Liz Fosslien, No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work

“Work provides us with a sense of purpose and can offer instant gratification in the form of praise, raises, and promotions. But the more we tie who we are to what we do, the more we emotionally attach to our jobs.”
Liz Fosslien, No Hard Feelings: Emotions at Work and How They Help Us Succeed

“Constant happiness is unattainable (or at least we have yet to experience it personally). We usually describe ourselves as “happy” when we get more than we already had or when we find out we are a little better off than those around us. Neither of these are permanent states. Contentedness, on the other hand, can be more emotionally stable. The most content people craft their ups and downs into redemption stories: something bad happened, but something good resulted.”
Liz Fosslien, No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work




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