John D. Caputo


Born
in Philadelphia, The United States
October 26, 1940

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John D. Caputo is an American philosopher who is the Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion Emeritus at Syracuse University and the David R. Cook Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Villanova University. Caputo is a major figure associated with Postmodern Christianity, Continental Philosophy of Religion, as well as the founder of the theological movement known as weak theology. Much of Caputo's work focuses on hermeneutics, phenomenology, deconstruction and theology.

Average rating: 4.0 · 2,345 ratings · 214 reviews · 53 distinct worksSimilar authors
What Would Jesus Deconstruc...

3.95 avg rating — 343 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
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On Religion

3.93 avg rating — 275 ratings — published 2001 — 25 editions
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The Weakness of God: A Theo...

4.13 avg rating — 193 ratings — published 2006 — 6 editions
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Philosophy and Theology

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 188 ratings — published 2006 — 8 editions
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Deconstruction in a Nutshel...

3.75 avg rating — 189 ratings — published 1996 — 4 editions
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Truth

3.87 avg rating — 149 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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The Prayers and Tears of Ja...

4.07 avg rating — 121 ratings — published 1997 — 7 editions
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How to Read Kierkegaard

3.85 avg rating — 156 ratings — published 2007 — 6 editions
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After the Death of God

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3.99 avg rating — 81 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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Hoping Against Hope: Confes...

4.06 avg rating — 95 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
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“The Right thinks that the breakdown of the family is the source of crime and poverty, and this they very insightfully blame on the homosexuals, which would be amusing were it not so tragic. Families and 'family values' are crushed by grinding poverty, which also makes violent crime and drugs attractive alternatives to desperate young men and sends young women into prostitution. Family values are no less corrupted by the corrosive effects of individualism, consumerism, and the accumulation of wealth. Instead of shouting this from the mountain tops, the get-me-to-heaven-and-the-rest-be-damned Christianity the Christian Right preaches is itself a version of selfish spiritual capitalism aimed at netting major and eternal dividends, and it fits hand in glove with American materialism and greed.”
John D. Caputo, What Would Jesus Deconstruct?: The Good News of Postmodernism for the Church

“Orthodoxy is idolatry if it means holding the 'correct opinions about God' - 'fundamentalism' is the most extreme and salient example of such idolatry - but not if it means holding faith in the right way, that is, not holding it at all but being held by God, in love and service. Theology is idolatry if it means what we say about God instead of letting ourselves be addressed by what God has to say to us. Faith is idolatrous if it is rigidly self-certain but not if it is softened in the waters of 'doubt.”
John D. Caputo, What Would Jesus Deconstruct?: The Good News of Postmodernism for the Church

“Too often, contemporary continental philosophers take the “other” of philosophy to mean literature, but not religion, which is for them just a little too wholly other, a little beyond their much heralded tolerance of alterity. They retain an antagonism to religious texts inherited straight from the Enlightenment, even though they pride themselves on having made the axioms and dogmas of the Enlightenment questionable. But the truth is that contemporary continental philosophy is marked by the language of the call and the response, of the gift, of hospitality to the other, of the widow, the orphan and the stranger, and by the very idea of the “wholly other,” a discourse that any with the ears to hear knows has a Scriptural provenance and a Scriptural resonance. ("A Prologue", Journal of Philosophy and Scripture 1.1, Fall 2003, p. 1).”
John D. Caputo



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