Maggie Lane



Average rating: 4.01 · 1,260 ratings · 140 reviews · 34 distinct worksSimilar authors
Jane Austen's World: The Li...

4.04 avg rating — 680 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Jane Austen and Food

3.86 avg rating — 207 ratings — published 1995 — 7 editions
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Jane Austen and Names

3.76 avg rating — 54 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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Jane Austen's England

3.90 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 1986 — 6 editions
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A Charming Place

3.80 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 1988
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Growing Older with Jane Austen

4.04 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2014
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Understanding Austen: Key C...

4.33 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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Needlepoint By Design: Vari...

4.54 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1970 — 2 editions
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On the Sofa with Jane Austen

4.10 avg rating — 20 ratings2 editions
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Jane Austen and Regency Bath

3.60 avg rating — 10 ratings
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“More than any other kind of relationship to food, hospitality reflects the underlying assumptions of society, assumptions which can and do shift with time. Social forms which once served society well by regulating and polishing behaviour for the better comfort of all can become ossified, empty and oppressive to the individual. Change may be necessary, but change must be motivated by good feeling and concern for others, not by desire to create an impression. Elegance and propriety are always desirable, because they smooth over any social disharmony, but they should be accompanied by real generosity of spirit; and where there is such generosity, want of elegance and propriety may be excused.”
Maggie Lane, Jane Austen and Food

“Jane Austen is quite clear that both sexes must be allowed the full play of their moral autonomy and that a healthy society values equally the contributions each can make. Danger arises when the sex which has the monopoly of money and mobility assumes that the pick of the world's pleasures must be therefore theirs to plunder. Marianne, Fanny and Jane are unfortunate in being desired and trifled with by men who have been used all their lives to having their own way. That these women, of no feeble character any of them, should be crushed to the point where their only resource seems to be self-destruction, must be a reflection on their society and on those in whom its power resides.”
Maggie Lane, Jane Austen and Food

“For Jane Austen, morality is not only a matter of personal responsibility between an individual and his conscience or his Maker; it is more social than that, it is a matter of how the conduct impinges on the lives of other people.”
Maggie Lane, Jane Austen and Food

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