Jeremy J. Siegel


Born
in Chicago, The United States
November 14, 1945

Genre


Jeremy J. Siegel is the Professor of Finance at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Average rating: 4.07 · 3,476 ratings · 161 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
Stocks for the Long Run

4.09 avg rating — 3,070 ratings — published 1994 — 10 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Future for Investors: W...

3.94 avg rating — 400 ratings — published 2005 — 13 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Strategy of Core Investing

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2010
Rate this book
Clear rating
Rendimenti finanziari e str...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Langfristig investieren

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Revolution on Wall Street: ...

by
3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1993
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Jeremy J. Siegel…
“By 2060, India’s economy is projected to be larger than China’s because of its greater population growth. India is forecast to produce about one-quarter of world GDP from 2040 through the rest of this century.”
Jeremy J. Siegel, Stocks for the Long Run: The Definitive Guide to Financial Market Returns & Long-Term Investment Strategies

“There is no question that the losing IPOs far outnumber the winners. Of the 8,606 firms examined, the returns on 6,796 of these firms, or 79 percent, have subsequently underperformed the returns on a representative small stock index, and almost half the firms have underper-formed by more than 10 percent per year.”
Jeremy J. Siegel, Stocks for the Long Run: The Definitive Guide to Financial Market Returns & Long-Term Investment Strategies

“The superior performance of the original S&P 500 firms surprises most investors. But value investors (as described in Chapter 12) know that growth stocks often are priced too high, and excitement over their prospects often induces investors to pay too high a price. Profitable firms that do not catch investors’ eyes are often underpriced. If investors reinvest the dividends of such firms, they are buying undervalued shares that will add significantly to their return.”
Jeremy Siegel



Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite Jeremy to Goodreads.