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David Hammond

Goodreads Author


Born
in The United States
Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
April 2011


David Hammond lives and dreams in Virginia with his wife and two daughters. During the day, he makes websites.

The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke (Revised and Condensed)

Act IScene I. Elsinore. A platform before the castle.

[Enter Horatio and Marcellus]

HORATIO:
I begged him not to follow that creepy ghost,
Did I not, Marcellus? But off he went!
And we are left to wonder what new fardels
This noble prince must wearily bear through life.
First of all, a father dead, and then,
A mother to an uncle wed. What next?
And what small part may comrades play to ease
The heartache and

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Published on July 23, 2022 11:51
Average rating: 4.26 · 19 ratings · 10 reviews · 14 distinct works
Reading 5X5: Writers' Edition

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2018 — 6 editions
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Bartleby Snopes Issue 15

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Metaphorosis: Best of 2017 ...

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Score: an SFF Symphony

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Everything in between: A Ki...

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Metaphorosis 2018: The Comp...

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Metaphorosis April 2021 (Me...

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Making the List: A Short Story

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More books by David Hammond…
Ulysses
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Don Quixote
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David Hammond wrote a new blog post

The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke (Revised and Condensed)

Act IScene I. Elsinore. A platform before the castle.[Enter Horatio and Marcellus]HORATIO:I begged him not to follow that creepy ghost,Did I not, Marc Read more of this blog post »
David Hammond is currently reading
Ulysses by James Joyce
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The Odyssey by Homer
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I haven't read The Odyssey before, despite having an old copy of Samuel Butler's translation. I've picked it up a few times over the years, but wasn't grabbed by it and put it back on the shelf. So when I made the decision to read it this time, I fou ...more
" This very popular quote appears to have a typo in it:

https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/3740...

Based on a longer version of the quote, it should read:

“L
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The Odyssey by Homer
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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
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A Swim in a Pond in the Rain by George Saunders
“To put it another way: having gone about as high up Hemingway Mountain as I could go, having realized that even at my best I could only ever hope to be an acolyte up there, resolving never again to commit the sin of being imitative, I stumbled back down into the valley and came upon a little shit-hill labeled “Saunders Mountain.”

“Hmm,” I thought. “It’s so little. And it’s a shit-hill.”

Then again, that was my name on it.

This is a big moment for any artist (this moment of combined triumph and disappointment), when we have to decide whether to accept a work of art that we have to admit we weren’t in control of as we made it and of which we’re not entirely sure we approve. It is less, less than we wanted it to be, and yet it’s more, too—it’s small and a bit pathetic, judged against the work of the great masters, but there it is, all ours.

What we have to do at that point, I think, is go over, sheepishly but boldly, and stand on our shit-hill, and hope it will grow.”
George Saunders
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Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
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Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
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More of David's books…
Jack London
“You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”
Jack London

Milan Kundera
“The stupidity of people comes from having an answer for everything. The wisdom of the novel comes from having a question for everything. When Don Quixote went out into the world, that world turned into a mystery before his eyes. That is the legacy of the first European novel to the entire subsequent history of the novel. The novelist teaches the reader to comprehend the world as a question. There is wisdom and tolerance in that attitude. In a world built on sacrosanct certainties the novel is dead. The totalitarian world, whether founded on Marx, Islam, or anything else, is a world of answers rather than questions. There, the novel has no place.”
Milan Kundera, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting

Joseph Campbell
“Once we have broken free of the prejudices of our own provincially limited ecclesiastical, tribal, or national rendition of the world archetypes, it becomes possible to understand that the supreme initiation is not that of the local motherly fathers, who then project aggression onto the neighbors for their own defense. The good news, which the World Redeemer brings and which so many have been glad to hear, zealous to preach, but reluctant, apparently, to demonstrate, is that God is love, the He can be, and is to be, loved, and that all without exception are his children. Such comparatively trivial matters as the remaining details of the credo, the techniques of worship, and devices of episcopal organization (which have so absorbed the interest of Occidental theologians that they are today seriously discussed as the principal questions of religion), are merely pedantic snares, unless kept ancillary to the major teaching. Indeed, where not so kept, they have the regressive effect: they reduce the father image back again to the dimensions of the totem. And this, of course, is what has happened throughout the Christian world. One would think that we had been called upon to decide or to know whom, of all of us, the Father prefers. Whereas, the teaching is much less flattering: "Judge not, that ye be not judged." The World Savior's cross, in spite of the behavior of its professed priests, is a vastly more democratic symbol than the local flag.”
Joseph Campbell, The Hero With a Thousand Faces

Gabriel García Márquez
“This was when she asked him whether it was true that love conquered all, as the songs said. 'It is true', he replied, 'but you would do well not to believe it.”
Gabriel García Márquez, Of Love and Other Demons

Salman Rushdie
“What kind of idea are you? Are you the kind that compromises, does deals, accomodates itself to society, aims to find a niche, to survive; or are you the cussed, bloody-minded, ramrod-backed type of damnfool notion that would rather break than sway with the breeze? – The kind that will almost certainly, ninety-nine times out of hundred, be smashed to bits; but, the hundredth time, will change the world.”
Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses

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