James H. Cone


Born
in Fordyce, Arkansas, The United States
August 05, 1936

Died
April 28, 2018

Genre

Influences


James Hal Cone was an advocate of Black liberation theology, a theology grounded in the experience of African Americans, and related to other Christian liberation theologies. In 1969, his book Black Theology and Black Power provided a new way to articulate the distinctiveness of theology in the black Church. James Cone’s work was influential and political from the time of his first publication, and remains so to this day. His work has been both utilized and critiqued inside and outside of the African American theological community.


Average rating: 4.3 · 4,870 ratings · 510 reviews · 17 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Cross and the Lynching ...

4.46 avg rating — 1,526 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Martin and Malcolm and Amer...

4.36 avg rating — 1,193 ratings — published 1991 — 6 editions
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God of the Oppressed

4.22 avg rating — 688 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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A Black Theology of Liberation

by
4.09 avg rating — 758 ratings — published 1970 — 5 editions
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Black Theology and Black Power

4.19 avg rating — 306 ratings — published 1969 — 8 editions
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The Spirituals and the Blues

4.05 avg rating — 152 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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Risks of Faith: The Emergen...

4.05 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 1999 — 3 editions
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My Soul Looks Back

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 1982 — 3 editions
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Said I Wasn't Gonna Tell No...

4.66 avg rating — 41 ratings3 editions
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For My People: Black Theolo...

4.20 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 1984 — 2 editions
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More books by James H. Cone…
“It is ironic that America, with its history of injustice to the poor, especially the black man and the Indian, prides itself on being a Christian nation.”
James Cone

“Indeed our survival and liberation depend upon our recognition of the truth when it is spoken and lived by the people. If we cannot recognize the truth, then it cannot liberate us from untruth. To know the truth is to appropriate it, for it is not mainly reflection and theory. Truth is divine action entering our lives and creating the human action of liberation.”
James Cone

“The Christian community, therefore, is that community that freely becomes oppressed, because they know that Jesus himself has defined humanity's liberation in the context of what happens to the little ones. Christians join the cause of the oppressed in the fight for justice not because of some philosophical principle of "the Good" or because of a religious feeling of sympathy for people in prison. Sympathy does not change the structures of injustice. The authentic identity of Christians with the poor is found in the claim which the Jesus-encounter lays upon their own life-style, a claim that connects the word "Christian" with the liberation of the poor. Christians fight not for humanity in general but for themselves and out of their love for concrete human beings.”
James H. Cone, God of the Oppressed
tags: p-135