George A. Romero


Born
in The Bronx, New York City
February 04, 1940

Died
July 16, 2017

Genre


George Andrew Romero was an American film director, screenwriter and editor, best known for his gruesome and satirical horror films about a hypothetical zombie apocalypse, beginning with Night of the Living Dead (1968). He is nicknamed "Godfather of all Zombies."

Average rating: 3.77 · 2,926 ratings · 336 reviews · 44 distinct worksSimilar authors
Dawn of the Dead

by
3.89 avg rating — 1,209 ratings — published 1978 — 16 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
George A. Romero's Empire o...

by
3.26 avg rating — 260 ratings — published 2014 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
George A. Romero's Empire o...

by
3.37 avg rating — 103 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
George Romero's Empire of t...

by
2.83 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 2015 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Toe Tags

by
3.11 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Little World of Humongo...

3.93 avg rating — 14 ratings3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Night of the Living Dead: T...

by
4.18 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
George Romero's Empire of t...

by
3.08 avg rating — 13 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
George A. Romeros Empire of...

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2
Rate this book
Clear rating
Night of the Living Dead

by
3.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1994
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by George A. Romero…
George A. Romero's Empire o... George A. Romero's Empire o... George Romero's Empire of t...
(3 books)
by
3.23 avg rating — 422 ratings

“When there's no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth.”
George A. Romero, Dawn of the Dead

“A zombie film is not fun without a bunch of stupid people running around and observing how they fail to handle the situation.”
George A. Romero

“Tony Williams: You’ve often mentioned that Tales of Hoffmann (1951) has been a major influence on you.

George Romero: It was the first film I got completely involved with. An aunt and uncle took me to see it in downtown Manhattan when it first played. And that was an event for me since I was about eleven at the time. The imagery just blew me away completely. I wanted to go and see a Tarzan movie but my aunt and uncle said, “No! Come and see a bit of culture here.” So I thought I was missing out. But I really fell in love with the film. There used to be a television show in New York called Million Dollar Movie. They would show the same film twice a day on weekdays, three times on Saturday, and three-to-four times on Sunday. Tales of Hoffmann appeared on it one week. I missed the first couple of days because I wasn’t aware that it was on. But the moment I found it was on, I watched virtually every telecast. This was before the days of video so, naturally, I couldn’t tape it. Those were the days you had to rent 16mm prints of any film. Most cities of any size had rental services and you could rent a surprising number of films. So once I started to look at Tales of Hoffmann I realized how much stuff Michael Powell did in the camera. Powell was so innovative in his technique. But it was also transparent so I could see how he achieved certain effects such as his use of an overprint in the scene of the ballet dancer on the lily ponds. I was beginning to understand how adept a director can be. But, aside from that, the imagery was superb. Robert Helpmann is the greatest Dracula that ever was. Those eyes were compelling. I was impressed by the way Powell shot Helpmann sweeping around in his cape and craning down over the balcony in the tavern. I felt the film was so unique compared to most of the things we were seeing in American cinema such as the westerns and other dreadful stuff I used to watch. Tales of Hoffmann just took me into another world in terms of its innovative cinematic technique. So it really got me going.

Tony Williams: A really beautiful print exists on laserdisc with commentary by Martin Scorsese and others.

George Romero: I was invited to collaborate on the commentary by Marty. Pat Buba (Tony’s brother) knew Thelma Schoonmaker and I got to meet Powell in later years. We had a wonderful dinner with him one evening. What an amazing guy! Eventually I got to see more of his movies that I’d never seen before such as I Know Where I’m Going and A Canterbury Tale. Anyway, I couldn’t do the commentary on Tales of Hoffmann with Marty. But, back in the old days in New York, Marty and I were the only two people who would rent a 16mm copy of the film. Every time I found it was out I knew that he had it and each time he wanted it he knew who had it! So that made us buddies.”
George A. Romero, George A. Romero: Interviews
tags: cinema

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Crazy Challenge C...: A-Z Author Challenge - 2012 296 257 Jan 17, 2013 02:56PM  
Cozy Mysteries : Lynne's Challenges 14 258 May 04, 2016 03:51PM  
The Seasonal Read...: This topic has been closed to new comments. Completed Tasks: PLEASE DO NOT DELETE ANY POST IN THIS THREAD 2629 411 Nov 30, 2016 09:00PM  
Horror Aficionados : March 2017 Group Read #2 - 20th Century Ghosts 111 138 May 03, 2017 09:03AM