E. Scott Jones

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E. Scott Jones

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Born
Miami, Oklahoma, The United States
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April 2009

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E. Scott Jones grew up in a small town in Oklahoma knowing since the age of five that he wanted to be a preacher. Then at age 29, he came out as a gay man, while serving as a youth minister at a Baptist church in Texas.

He is a graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University and received his Ph. D. in philosophy from the University of Oklahoma. He has previously pastored churches in Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma.

Today Scott is the Senior Minister of the First Central Congregational Church in Omaha, Nebraska and a lecturer in the Philosophy Department of Creighton University. He and his husband Michael are the delighted parents of a toddler son. Scott is an accomplished activist with keen insights on life in the American heartland.

Average rating: 4.64 · 14 ratings · 0 reviews · 1 distinct workSimilar authors
Open: A Memoir of Faith, Fa...

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NPR Interview

Our local NPR station KIOS has a new Sunday morning interview show in the spot once occupied by Krista Tippett's On Being. The show is entitled Lives and is hosted by my friend Stuart Chittenden. This last Sunday, they broadcast an interview of me that we pre-recorded back at the end of May. I talk about my faith, my coming out, the pandemic, being a dad, and my divorce and what lessons I've learn Read more of this blog post »
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Published on July 26, 2022 09:18
Words for a Dying...
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The Books of Jacob
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The New Negro: Th...
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Words for a Dying World by Hannah Malcolm
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The World Made Otherwise by Timothy J Gorringe
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What will our culture need to be like to be as resilient as possible in the face of climate change? That's the key question Gorringe is considering in this book, one of the more expansive theology books I've recently read (there's a chapter on moneta ...more
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Sex is a Funny Word by Cory Silverberg
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I heard Silverberg on NPR's Fresh Air only a few days after my son began to ask some questions that showed our conversations were moving beyond the basics of consent, respect, and proper names for body parts. I've read through book now myself and fin ...more
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The Stone Reader by Peter Catapano
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Looking for a Moose by Phyllis Root
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Bought in at Valley Books in Jackson, Wyoming after we failed to ever see a moose while in Yellowstone and Grand Teton.
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My Book of Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Life by D.K. Publishing
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Yellowstone by Yellowstone Association
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A place where all Goodreads members can work together to improve the Goodreads book catalog. Non-librarians are welcome to join the group as well, to ...more



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message 19: by E.

E. My reflections on V. S. Naipaul on the news of his death. http://escottjones.typepad.com/myques...


message 18: by E.

E. Anyone else dislike this new format. Yes, I'm sure I'll get used to it, but it's rather obnoxious.


message 17: by E.

E. I've also begun re-reading Leaves of Grass. Sublime, of course.


message 16: by E.

E. Next up, I'm going to re-read Things Fall Apart in honor of Chinua Achebe who recently died.


message 15: by E.

E. Re-reading The Last Battle was a great way to spend this Saturday before Easter. I cried like a silly thing all through my favourite parts.


message 14: by E.

E. For my next "fun" reading, I'm going to re-read The Last Battle by C. S. Lewis. It is difficult on Goodreads to indicate that one is re-reading a book. This is the longest span in my life in which I've gone without re-reading the Chronicles of Narnia, my favourite stories. I haven't re-read them since I lived in Dallas in the mid-Aughts. I'm reading The Last Battle because of the depression I've experience in February and March, and I believe that this novel will be healing. The chapter "Further Up and Further In" has always been one of my favourite in fiction, and it has inspired me since I first read it in sixth grade.


message 13: by E.

E. This week I was in Portland, Oregon, where I visited Powell's Books. I was only there for one and one half hours. I bought ten books, mostly philosophy and religion. Fortunately, they all fit in my luggage to bring home.


message 12: by E.

E. I next intend to read some Cicero. I've had three Penguin volumes of his for almost twenty years, but never read them. I'll likely only read one this passage through the Western canon. Any advice? I'm particularly interested in either "The Nature of the Gods" or "On the Good Life."


message 11: by E.

E. Back in 1996 I began writing down all the books I read. I'm about to complete the second such little notepad booklet. I've never sat down with Goodreads to enter all those old books. Decided to kill some time this morning waiting for Michael.


message 10: by E.

E. At the church book sale I found the next three volumes of the Forsyte Chronicles!


message 9: by E.

E. Yesterday I bought my end-of-the year books for myself: The Sense of an Ending, 1Q84, The Night Circus, and The Marriage Plot.


message 8: by E.

E. I'm very excited that some theology books I've had on my to-read list for years have arrived in the mail today!


message 7: by E.

E. I'm two books away from completing the goal I set for the 2011 Reading Challenge!


message 6: by E.

E. A snow day sure is good for getting my reading caught up! I've finished three books in the last 24 hours.


message 5: by E.

E. Okay, I know I'm currently reading WAY too many books. But a handful of them are what I'm currently using for my sermon series.


message 4: by E.

E. Ove the weekend I did some antique shopping in Grove, OK and purchased a copy of a book by Bess Streeter Aldrich, a Nebraska writer I have not read, and an illustrated copy of Tristram Shandy.


message 3: by E.

E. So, I had an hour to kill yesterday and stopped in our new Half Price Books here in OKC. And left having spent $50+. I did find some things I've been looking for good used copies of for a while, including the science fiction trilogy of C. S. Lewis', which I have never read. These were the original paperback editions, really funky, modernist cover images.


message 2: by E.

E. I have written about my top books of the decade: http://escottjones.typepad.com/myques...


message 1: by E.

E. In his review of Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Life by Gerald Martin, Paul Berman writes this stunning description of Garcia Marquez' writing:

Every last sentence in “The Autumn of the Patriarch” offers a heroic demonstration of man’s triumph over language — unless it is language’s triumph over man. The sentences begin in one person’s voice and conclude in someone else’s, or change their subject halfway through, or wander across the centuries, and, even so, conform sufficiently to the rules of rhetoric to carry you along. To read is to gasp. You want to break into applause at the shape and grandeur of those sentences, not to mention their length. And yet to do so you would need to set down the book, which cannot be done, owing to the fact that, just when the impulse to clap your hands has become irresistible, the sentence you are reading has begun to round a corner, and you have no alternative but to clutch onto the book as if steering a car that has veered out of control.



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