Matthew A. Rozell

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August 2015


Average rating: 4.34 · 2,498 ratings · 184 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Things Our Fathers Saw:...

4.31 avg rating — 1,252 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
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A Train Near Magdeburg: A T...

4.40 avg rating — 708 ratings2 editions
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The Things Our Fathers Saw—...

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The Things Our Fathers Saw—...

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The Things Our Fathers Saw ...

3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings3 editions
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The Things Our Fathers Saw ...

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A World War II B-17 Crew Pr...

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The Things Our Fathers Saw-...

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A Tuskegee Airman Over Euro...

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More books by Matthew A. Rozell…
The Things Our Fathers Saw:... The Things Our Fathers Saw—... The Things Our Fathers Saw—... The Things Our Fathers Saw-...
(4 books)
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A Train Near Magdeburg by Matthew A. Rozell
"One of the most important books I've ever read. The first hand knowledge interwoven with the author's passionate tellings of his travels is unforgettable and moving."
More of Matthew's books…
“In any war, an apt metaphor is that sometimes hands are forced to be played before all the cards have been dealt.”
Matthew Rozell, The Things Our Fathers Saw: The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation from Hometown, USA-Voices of the Pacific Theater

“Richard Gregory Alagna was born on November 16, 1925, and was attending college in Brooklyn, New York, when the news of Pearl Harbor reached him.”
Matthew A. Rozell, The Things Our Fathers Saw—The Untold Stories of the World War II Generation-Volume II: War in the Air—From the Great Depression to Combat

“Ravensbrück was built for 3000 prisoners. At its height it held 35,000, 30,000 of whom were killed here. From the beginning, the SS did not want women with children in the camp; but as more and more territory was overrun, the camp swelled. After the Warsaw Ghetto uprising in 1943, there were hundreds of pregnant women deported here. Some are forced to abort; as numbers grow, women give birth and the babies are taken to a ‘hospital’ where they are slowly starved to death. The crematorium worked nonstop. Ash piles were dumped into the nearby lake as the Russians closed in. When the camp was overrun by the Red Army, 2000 women and 2000 men, mostly too infirm to be death-marched out of the camp, are found. Here”
Matthew A. Rozell, A Train Near Magdeburg: A Teacher's Journey into the Holocaust, and the Reuniting of the Survivors and Liberators, 70 years on




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