Sandy Weatherburn

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Sandy Weatherburn

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July 2015

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Sandy Weatherburn The Owl and the Pussycat created by Edward Lear as they represent accepting each other's differences in appearance and character. They marry against…moreThe Owl and the Pussycat created by Edward Lear as they represent accepting each other's differences in appearance and character. They marry against convention and show love one another simply by a commitment and a ring. The happiest couple that have eaten and danced together in my memory since I was read this lovely poem as a child. (less)
Sandy Weatherburn I write a regular blog about death and technology. If you would like to read it and subscribe please visit: http://socialembers.com/information/b...
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The Life File

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Tess of the D'Urb...
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The City of God
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Sandy Weatherburn wants to read
Death, the Dead and Popular Culture by Ruth Penfold-Mounce
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“As a newborn baby each of us was helpless and, without the care and kindness we received then, we would not have survived. Because the dying are also unable to help themselves, we should relieve them of discomfort and anxiety, and assist them, as far as we can, to die with composure.”
Dalai Lama
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The Tibetan Book Of Living And Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche
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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche
"I read this book after my 11year old son was diagnosed with terminal cancer. I needed to find some spiritual form of understanding as to what was happening.

The first section of the book deals with how to live well while the second part of the book..." Read more of this review »
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From Here to Eternity by Caitlin Doughty
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Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
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The Tibetan Book Of Living And Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche
“Peaceful death is really an essential human right, more essential perhaps even than the right to vote or the right to justice; it is a right on which, all religious traditions tell us, a great deal depends for the well-being and spiritual future of the dying person. There”
Sogyal Rinpoche
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The City of God by Augustine of Hippo
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Levels of Life by Julian Barnes
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The Reformation by Diarmaid MacCulloch
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More of Sandy's books…
A.A. Milne
“I think we dream so we don’t have to be apart for so long. If we’re in each other’s dreams, we can be together all the time.”
A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

Margaret Atwood
“To go from a familiar thing, however undesirable, into the unknown, is always a matter for apprehension, and I suppose that is why so many people are afraid to die.”
Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace

Margaret Atwood
“Why is it we want so badly to memorialize ourselves? Even while we're still alive. We wish to assert our existence, like dogs peeing on fire hydrants. We put on display our framed photographs, our parchment diplomas, our silver-plated cups; we monogram our linen, we carve our names on trees, we scrawl them on washroom walls. It's all the same impulse. What do we hope from it? Applause, envy, respect? Or simply attention, of any kind we can get?
At the very least we want a witness. We can't stand the idea of our own voices falling silent finally, like a radio running down.”
Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin

Margaret Atwood
“Nothing is more difficult than to understand the dead, I've found; but nothing is more dangerous than to ignore them.”
Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin
tags: dead

Charles Dickens
“There is prodigious strength in sorrow and despair.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities




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