Sandy Weatherburn

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Sandy Weatherburn The Owl and the Pussycat created by Edward Lear as they represent accepting each other's differences in appearance and character. They marry against c…moreThe Owl and the Pussycat created by Edward Lear as they represent accepting each other's differences in appearance and character. They marry against convention and show love one another simply by a commitment and a ring. The happiest couple that have eaten and danced together in my memory since I was read this lovely poem as a child. (less)
Sandy Weatherburn I write a regular blog about death and technology. If you would like to read it and subscribe please visit: http://socialembers.com/information/b...
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The Life File

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The Voyage Out
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Sandy Weatherburn is currently reading
The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf
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Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell
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The Story of an African Farm by Olive Schreiner
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Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams
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Crude and lewd.

This was a Christmas present. It has a really nice cover, but that was all I liked about it.

I am giving it away to charity.
Waves Break by Barry W. Litherland
"One sure way of keeping readers feeling engaged is to tell a story through the eyes of an interesting and well-developed narrator. In such stories, the striking personality of the protagonist is able to shape the narrative, keeping it varied and, mor" Read more of this review »
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Birds Hold Our Secrets by Anna M Biley
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I am so glad I purchased this book. It is a real gem and an intimate insight into another person’s grief. Anna recounts how she experienced the death of her husband, how she felt during his illness and writes about her personal grief. I enjoyed the l ...more
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Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson
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Your Body's Many Cries for Water by Fereydoon Batmanghelidj
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The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh
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Dracula by Bram Stoker
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Goodness, I never thought that I would ever read this book, but I have and I feel like it was an epic read. I loved this edition as it is really nice to hold in your hands, and there is lots of other information included about the author and the nove ...more
More of Sandy's books…
A.A. Milne
“I think we dream so we don’t have to be apart for so long. If we’re in each other’s dreams, we can be together all the time.”
A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

Margaret Atwood
“To go from a familiar thing, however undesirable, into the unknown, is always a matter for apprehension, and I suppose that is why so many people are afraid to die.”
Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace

Margaret Atwood
“Why is it we want so badly to memorialize ourselves? Even while we're still alive. We wish to assert our existence, like dogs peeing on fire hydrants. We put on display our framed photographs, our parchment diplomas, our silver-plated cups; we monogram our linen, we carve our names on trees, we scrawl them on washroom walls. It's all the same impulse. What do we hope from it? Applause, envy, respect? Or simply attention, of any kind we can get?
At the very least we want a witness. We can't stand the idea of our own voices falling silent finally, like a radio running down.”
Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin

Margaret Atwood
“Nothing is more difficult than to understand the dead, I've found; but nothing is more dangerous than to ignore them.”
Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin
tags: dead

Charles Dickens
“There is prodigious strength in sorrow and despair.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities




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