John Thorn


Born
in Stuttgart, Germany
April 17, 1947

Genre


Average rating: 3.84 · 1,268 ratings · 135 reviews · 58 distinct worksSimilar authors
Baseball in the Garden of Eden

3.72 avg rating — 579 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Hidden Game of Baseball

by
4.26 avg rating — 153 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Total Baseball: The Ultimat...

by
4.39 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 1989 — 16 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Complete Armchair Book ...

4.23 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 2004
Rate this book
Clear rating
Baseball: Our Game

3.71 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 1995 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Pro Football Hall of Fa...

by
3.92 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
A Century of Baseball Lore

3.86 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1974 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The National Pastime

3.42 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1982 — 6 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Treasures of the Baseball H...

3.89 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1998 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Armchair Book of Baseball

4.22 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1985 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by John Thorn…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“If there is a man on third and one out, the team should score, on average, .897 runs. What does that mean? That 89.7 percent of the time, the man on third should score? No, not exactly: It means that the run-scoring potential is .897 as a function of there being a man on third and at least two additional batters in the half inning, barring a double play, pickoff, or failed steal attempt. Totaling the run potential of the man on third plus that of the two additional batters, who may get on base themselves, provides the .897. In the case of the first batter, let’s say that no one was on base—then the run potential for the team would be .249 (see the table for the intersection of one out and no one on base). Thus we see that in the situation this batter confronts, .249 of the team’s run value is attributable to the batter’s possibility of reaching base, bringing up not only the next batter but perhaps several more, depending upon the outcomes. This means that of the run value inherent in the situation “man on third, one out” (namely, .897), .249 resides with the batter(s) and .648 with the baserunner. In other words, a runner on third with one out will score, on average, 64.8 percent of the time.”
John Thorn, The Hidden Game of Baseball: A Revolutionary Approach to Baseball and Its Statistics

“Reflecting on the appeal of history in Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, heroine Catherine Morland comments, “I often think it odd that it should be so dull, for a great deal of it must be invention.” Indeed. And in no field of American endeavor is invention more rampant than in baseball, whose whole history is a lie from beginning to end, from its creation myth to its rosy models of commerce, community, and fair play. The game’s epic feats and revered figures, its pieties about racial harmony and bleacher democracy, its artful blurring of sport and business—all of it is bunk, tossed up with a wink and a nudge. Yet we love both the game and the flimflam because they are both so . . . American.”
John Thorn, Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
The History Book ...: BASEBALL 405 504 6 hours, 32 min ago  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite John to Goodreads.