Gertrude Himmelfarb


Born
in Brooklyn, The United States
August 08, 1922

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Gertrude Himmelfarb, also known as Bea Kristol, is an American historian. She has been a leader and conservative interpretations of history and historiography. She has written extensively on intellectual history, with a focus on Britain and the Victorian era, as well as on contemporary society and culture.

Himmelfarb was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Bertha (née Lerner) and Max Himmelfarb, both of Russian-Jewish background. She received her undergraduate degree from Brooklyn College in 1942 and her doctorate from the University of Chicago in 1950. She also studied at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York and at Girton College, Cambridge University. In 1942, she married Irving Kristol, known as the "godfather" of
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Average rating: 3.72 · 710 ratings · 97 reviews · 33 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Roads to Modernity: The...

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The De-moralization Of Soci...

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On Looking Into the Abyss: ...

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One Nation, Two Cultures

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The Moral Imagination: From...

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Darwin and the Darwinian Re...

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Jewish Odyssey of George Eliot

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Victorian Minds

3.95 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1995 — 6 editions
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Marriage and Morals Among t...

3.74 avg rating — 19 ratings5 editions
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The People of the Book: Phi...

4.06 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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“...when President Clinton, on the anniversary of his election, spoke in the church in Tennessee where Martin Luther King, Jr., had delivered his last sermon. Inspired by the place and the occasion, he made one of the most eloquent speeches of his presidency. What would King have said, he asked, had he lived to see this day?

"He would say, I did not live and die to see the American family destroyed. I did not live and die to see thirteen-year-old boys get automatic weapons and gun down nine-year-olds just for the kick of it. I did not live and die to see young people destroy their lives with drugs and then build fortunes destroying the lives of others. This is not what I came here to do.

I fought for freedom, he would say, but not for the freedom of people to kill each other with reckless abandon; not for the freedom of children to have children and the fathers of the children walk away from them and abandon them as if they don't amount to anything. I fought for people to have the right to work, but not have whole communities and people abandoned. This is not what I lived and died for."

After describing what his administration was doing to curb drugs and violence, the President concluded that the government alone could not do the job. The problem was caused by "the breakdown of the family, the community and the disappearance of jobs," and unless we "reach deep inside to the values, the spirit, the soul and the truth of human nature, none of the other things we seek to do will ever take us where we need to go.”
Gertrude Himmelfarb, The De-moralization Of Society: From Victorian Virtues to Modern Values

“The separation of church and state, however interpreted, did not signify the separation of church and society.”
Gertrude Himmelfarb, The Roads to Modernity: The British, French, and American Enlightenments

“To look upon religion as the ultimate source of morality, and hence of a good society and a sound policy, is not demeaning to religion. On the contrary, it pays religion—and God—the great tribute of being essential to the welfare of mankind. And it does credit to man as well, who is deemed capable of subordinating his lower nature to his higher, of venerating and giving obeisance to something above himself.”
Gertrude Himmelfarb, The Roads to Modernity: The British, French, and American Enlightenments



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