Murray Gell-Mann


Born
in Manhattan, New York, The United States
September 15, 1929

Died
May 24, 2019


American physicist who received the 1969 Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the theory of elementary particles. He was the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, a Distinguished Fellow and co-founder of the Santa Fe Institute, Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department of the University of New Mexico, and the Presidential Professor of Physics and Medicine at the University of Southern California.

Average rating: 3.86 · 1,719 ratings · 98 reviews · 14 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Quark and the Jaguar: A...

3.85 avg rating — 1,615 ratings — published 1994 — 18 editions
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The Eightfold Way

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4.56 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2000 — 6 editions
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Particle Physics

4.17 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2005
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The Regular and the Random

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004
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Nonextensive Entropy: Inter...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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The interpretation of the n...

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Elementary Particles and th...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1991 — 2 editions
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Something Incredibly Wonder...

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4.16 avg rating — 124 ratings — published 2009
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Last of the Curlews

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4.14 avg rating — 246 ratings — published 1954 — 15 editions
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Themes in Southwest Prehistory

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3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1994
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More books by Murray Gell-Mann…
“Today the network of relationships linking the human race to itself and to the rest of the biosphere is so complex that all aspects affect all others to an extraordinary degree. Someone should be studying the whole system, however crudely that has to be done, because no gluing together of partial studies of a complex nonlinear system can give a good idea of the behavior of the whole. ”
Murray Gell-Mann

“In 1963, when I assigned the name "quark" to the fundamental constituents of the nucleon, I had the sound first, without the spelling, which could have been "kwork." Then, in one of my occasional perusals of Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce, I came across the word "quark" in the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark." Since "quark" (meaning, for one thing, the cry of a gull) was clearly intended to rhyme with "Mark," as well as "bark" and other such words, I had to find an excuse to pronounce it as "kwork." But the book represents the dreams of a publican named Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker. Words in the text are typically drawn from several sources at once, like the "portmanteau words" in Through the Looking Glass. From time to time, phrases occur in the book that are partially determined by calls for drinks at the bar. I argued, therefore, that perhaps one of the multiple sources of the cry "Three quarks for Muster Mark" might be "Three quarts for Mister Mark," in which case the pronunciation "kwork" would not be totally unjustified. In any case, the number three fitted perfectly the way quarks occur in nature.”
Murray Gell-Mann, The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex

“Think how hard physics would be if particles could think”
Murray Gell-Mann

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Finnegans Wake Gr...: Page 383 (297R) Three quarks 3 8 Feb 28, 2014 08:29AM