T.C. Weber

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Melki
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T.C. Weber

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Member Since
December 2015

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Ted Weber has pursued writing and music since childhood, and learned filmmaking and screenwriting in college, along with a little bit of physics. Trapped at home during the "Snowmageddon" of 2010, he transformed those interests into novel writing, and has been honing his skills ever since. By day, Mr. Weber works as an ecologist for a non-profit organization and has had a number of scientific papers and book chapters published. He lives in Annapolis, Maryland with his wife Karen. He enjoys traveling and has visited all seven continents. (Some of these travels are documented at http://www.mytripjournal.com/globalyawp, which received a "Best trip journal" award). ...more

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T.C. Weber I only get "writer's block" when my characters get in a situation that seems impossible to escape. Then I have the characters talk it through until th…moreI only get "writer's block" when my characters get in a situation that seems impossible to escape. Then I have the characters talk it through until they come up with a solution. Only a small part of the conversation may make it onto the page, but it's just like real life - some problems require a lot of brainstorming and hypothesis testing.(less)
T.C. Weber Writing is hard work and involves a lot of drudgery (particularly editing). But it's rewarding to see characters and worlds come alive. My favorite mo…moreWriting is hard work and involves a lot of drudgery (particularly editing). But it's rewarding to see characters and worlds come alive. My favorite moments are when a character veers from the outline and does something unexpected, especially if it's something a lot smarter and more inventive than the outline called for. Unfortunately this doesn't happen often, but when it does, I throw away the outline and go with it. (Thankfully my outlines are only a few pages).(less)
Average rating: 4.34 · 129 ratings · 61 reviews · 7 distinct worksSimilar authors
Sleep State Interrupt

4.14 avg rating — 64 ratings — published 2016 — 4 editions
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The Wrath of Leviathan

4.65 avg rating — 20 ratings2 editions
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Zero-Day Rising

4.87 avg rating — 15 ratings2 editions
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Born in Salt

4.29 avg rating — 14 ratings3 editions
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The Survivors

4.38 avg rating — 8 ratings3 editions
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The Story

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3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings2 editions
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The War for Reality

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings
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More books by T.C. Weber…

New release: The Survivors

My latest book, The Survivors, was just released by Solstice Publishing.

The Survivors, a post-apocalyptic horror novella written for adult readers, describes a calamitous future in which runaway climate change has made the planet nearly uninhabitable. Civilization has collapsed, and every day is a struggle for the remaining few.

Lucy, a young mother of two, dreams of a better life by bringing back Read more of this blog post »
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Published on May 08, 2022 07:32 Tags: cli-fi, horror, novella, post-apocalyptic, survivalist
Sleep State Interrupt The Wrath of Leviathan Zero-Day Rising
(3 books)
by
4.35 avg rating — 107 ratings

The Conqueror of the Clouds (Science Fiction & Fantasy)
3 chapters   —   updated Apr 12, 2020 11:06AM
Description: A high-stakes airship race around the world!
The Schnauzer Detective (Children's Books)
2 chapters   —   updated Apr 12, 2020 10:40AM
Description: When things go missing, it's up to Digit, the family schnauzer, to solve the case!
Change and Continuity (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Aug 28, 2017 11:03AM
Description: A bipolar history of humanity
The Hungry Games (Children's Books)
1 chapters   —   updated Aug 28, 2017 10:20AM
Description: Digit the schnauzer is hungry. Can she convince her humans to give her dinner?
The Story (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Jul 26, 2016 03:01PM
Description: In this short story, Waylee Freid, a young reporter in a near-future Baltimore, uncovers evidence that a powerful corporation called MediaCorp secretly co-opted the government to take control of nearly everything people see and hear. Can she get her evidence out and reverse the process before it's too late? Or will her editors succumb to outside pressure and bury her story?
More of T.C.’s writing…
Sunvault: Stories...
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by Phoebe Wagner (Goodreads Author)
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Outlaw Platoon: H...
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The Many Personal...
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T.C.’s Recent Updates

T.C. Weber is now friends with Lane
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Off Season by Jack Ketchum
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Feed by M.T. Anderson
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M.T. Anderson's dystopian YA novel "Feed" is a brilliant and prophetic satire of modern consumerism gone amok. Following a common cyberpunk trope of people's brains being connected in a computer network (the "feed"), the story is seen through the eye ...more
The Survivors by T.C. Weber
The Survivors by T.C. Weber
Born in Salt by T.C. Weber
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1632 by Eric Flint
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Great historical details but uninteresting story.

In 1632, the fictional town of Grantville, WV, is plopped into the middle of Germany during the 30 Years War. The historical details kept me reading, but the story itself lacked tension. At no point di
...more
T.C. Weber entered a giveaway
The Kaiju Preservation Society by John Scalzi
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T.C. Weber added a status update: All three books of the near-future BetterWorld cyberpunk trilogy, along with added material, are now available in one ebook!
Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09...
ePub: https://bit.ly/3pVKjNv

An unemployed bipolar journalist, her VR-addicted sister, and a teenage hacker from public housing try to stop a giant media corporation from controlling the world.
T.C. Weber is currently reading
Sunvault by Phoebe Wagner
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Quotes by T.C. Weber  (?)
Quotes are added by the Goodreads community and are not verified by Goodreads. (Learn more)

“Not everyone can be a saint, but we can at least try not to be assholes.”
T.C. Weber

“Is it the purpose of the writer or artist to conform to prevailing norms or government dictates? No. It is to challenge, to present alternatives, to raise a mirror with many facets, so that society can question dogma and follow the path of their choosing, without fetters.”
T.C. Weber, Sleep State Interrupt

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Cyberpunk: Greetings from a cyberpunk author 1 14 Jan 19, 2020 05:58AM  
Anarchist & Radic...: * Say welcome in here! 166 733 Jun 21, 2022 06:14AM  
“This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.”
Walt Whitman

“Enlighten the people, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day.”
Thomas Jefferson

“Not everyone can be a saint, but we can at least try not to be assholes.”
T.C. Weber

“Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”
Rob Siltanen

“Is it the purpose of the writer or artist to conform to prevailing norms or government dictates? No. It is to challenge, to present alternatives, to raise a mirror with many facets, so that society can question dogma and follow the path of their choosing, without fetters.”
T.C. Weber, Sleep State Interrupt

1865 SciFi and Fantasy Book Club — 32355 members — last activity 41 minutes ago
Hi there! SFFBC is a welcoming place for readers to share their love of speculative fiction through group reads, buddy reads, challenges, ...more
26989 Goodreads Authors/Readers — 44167 members — last activity 30 minutes ago
This group is dedicated to connecting readers with Goodreads authors. It is divided by genres, and includes folders for writing resources, book websit ...more
41424 Anarchist & Radical Book Club — 2062 members — last activity Jun 26, 2022 10:17PM
This is a group to read and discuss anarchist practice and theory, by gathering a large body of anarchist literature, non-fiction, and theory, as well ...more
1137802 The Best Literary Adventure — 318 members — last activity Jun 28, 2022 08:15AM
This is a group where authors, writers, readers can connect and share about their experience in publishing, writing and reading. Also, a place where e ...more
1233 Cyberpunk — 940 members — last activity Feb 06, 2022 05:33AM
A group for fans of all things cyberpunk. Have fun. Make something happen. Authors, please use the 'Marketing, Beta Readers, Reviews' folder to post ...more
220 Goodreads Librarians Group — 145791 members — last activity 2 minutes ago
A place where all Goodreads members can work together to improve the Goodreads book catalog. Non-librarians are welcome to join the group as well, to ...more
167512 World, Writing, Wealth — 3706 members — last activity 3 hours, 4 min ago
Friends, would you care to partake in a learned discussion of current events, the global economy, writing, selling, film, and reading? Then gift us wi ...more
88212 A Good Thriller — 12070 members — last activity 47 minutes ago
Action packed gripping, exciting and tense thrillers, mysteries, that's what we like reading. So many great authors out there to read. Let's share our ...more
799440 Indie and Self-Published Author Support — 951 members — last activity Apr 24, 2022 03:10AM
Breaking into the world of writing through the self-publishing gateway can be daunting and overwhelming. This is a support group where indie and aspir ...more
1152727 Share your story! — 123 members — last activity Jan 21, 2022 10:54PM
As most of you probably know, being a reader gives you a desire to write and create your own story. This is a community where we can share our storie ...more
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Comments (showing 1-22)    post a comment »
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message 22: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Majenta wrote: "Hello, T.C.! Thank you for contacting me! I hope you are keeping as safe and well and possible and having a great week. Happy reading, writing, and everything else. Blessings!
Best wishes from Majenta"


Blessings and best wishes to you too!


message 21: by Majenta

Majenta Hello, T.C.! Thank you for contacting me! I hope you are keeping as safe and well and possible and having a great week. Happy reading, writing, and everything else. Blessings!
Best wishes from Majenta


message 20: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Tracey wrote: "Thank you so much for the friend invite!"

You're welcome!


message 19: by Tracey

Tracey Thank you so much for the friend invite!


message 18: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Kyle wrote: "Thank you so much for the friend request!
Alien is definitely in my Top 3 all time favorites.
Great choice!"


What are your other two?


message 17: by Kyle

Kyle Thank you so much for the friend request!
Alien is definitely in my Top 3 all time favorites.
Great choice!


message 16: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Ꮗ€♫◗☿ ❤️ wrote: "T. C.,
I’m just popping by to say hello!
I look forward to our interactions.
"

Nice GIF!


Ꮗ€♫◗☿ ❤️ ilikebooksbest.com ❤️ T. C.,
I’m just popping by to say hello!
I look forward to our interactions.



message 14: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Here are some questions and answers from a thriller panel I was on recently:

1. Pacing-- What does it mean to you and how do you maintain it?
A thriller has to be generally fast-paced. That’s part of the thrilling experience. In my books, and I think this applies to most books, not just thrillers, every scene should move the plot forward. In proactive scenes, the POV character has a goal, there’s a conflict that gets in the way, and a setback, where the character doesn’t get exactly what he or she wants. In reactive scenes, the character is reeling from something bad that’s happened, he or she has to decide what to do next, there may not be any good options, but he or she decides to do something, picking the least bad option. Not all scenes should be packed with action, you need some variety. So that’s where the reactive scenes and character development come in. I end each chapter with something unresolved, something that will lead the reader to the following chapter. In Wrath of Leviathan, the villain is getting closer and closer to the heroes, so showing the villain’s progress as the last scene of a chapter builds tension. Finally, I would say cut out anything you don’t need. Start your scene as late as possible and end it as early as possible.

2. Character sketches. Who are your characters and do you come up with them before you start a novel or do you develop them as you go along? Have you ever tried doing the opposite of what you do?
In Wrath of Leviathan, my main characters are two sisters, Waylee, who is an unemployed bipolar journalist and musician, and Kiyoko, who is much younger, and is a virtual reality addict and designs game environments and real-world costumes for a living. There are a lot of other characters also. The main villain is a divorced ex-cop who’s now a mercenary. He cares about his kids, who he’s not allowed to see anymore, but everyone else is just a means to an end. I create detailed profiles for my major characters, fleshing out their goals, personalities, backgrounds, appearances, etc. These may change while drafting the story, but usually not a whole lot. I try to make the characters interesting, and different from each other. The characters themselves change during the course of the story, following an arc that’s integrated with the events of the story; in other words, the character affects the story and the story affects the character.

3. Much has been said about the plotter vs. pantser debate. Do you work from an outline or do you fly by the seat of your pants. How did you choose this method and have you ever tried another way.
I typically write short stories seat of the pants, more or less, but I always outline novels. They’re too long and complex to really get right without some kind of road map. I follow Randy Ingermanson’s Snowflake method and Larry Brooks’s Story Engineering, more or less. The first step is to brainstorm story ideas and pick one worth writing about. I turn this into a “what if” question (e.g., “What if nearly all information was controlled by a powerful elite? Could ordinary people overturn such a system?”) and a one-sentence novel summary (e.g., “An unemployed journalist and her friends try to stop a power-mad CEO from controlling the world.”) The next step is to expand that sentence to a full paragraph describing the story setup, major plot points, and ending of the novel. Then I develop the main characters and their goals, motivations, back story, etc. I weave the character arcs into the plot and write a short synopsis followed by a long synopsis. I convert this to a scene list in Scrivener, with a virtual index card for each scene (ideally with the scene arc outlined). Then finally I start writing, starting with the opening scene and writing usually one scene/day. As I write, the story changes, sometimes quite a bit, but at least I have a roadmap to follow.

4. Chronology: when you write do you proceed in chronological order or do you jump around? How and why do you use this method?
I try to proceed in chronological order, but in the BetterWorld series, whenever the characters are separated, they follow different threads, and often I’ll be so into that thread, what that character is doing, that I follow it for several chapters before going back and working on a different thread.

5. What are some techniques you use to create and maintain suspense?
First, I like high stakes that are both broad and personal. For example, in the BetterWorld trilogy, MediaCorp’s information monopoly makes them essentially the most powerful dictatorship in history. And Waylee, the main character of the first book, will do anything to stop that, and is further driven because MediaCorp had her fired from her newspaper and blacklisted.
Second, make the villains more powerful than the heroes. The heroes of my trilogy are talented, but are essentially normal people, with no money and not much influence, but they’re up against the most powerful corporation in history and a government that does their bidding. Then I add missions that seem impossible, like recording secret conversations with the president, or taking over the Super Bowl. How on earth will the heroes pull that off? And if they don’t pull it off, the world is screwed.
Third, pile on the problems. Whenever things seem bad, make them worse.
And then have a ticking clock, deadlines that the characters have to beat.

6. Let's talk a bit about Point of View. What POV do you prefer? When it comes to thrillers, which POV is better? Why? What are the advantages and disadvantages to the various POV's?
I prefer third person close, so the reader can get inside the character’s head. I wrote a dystopian novel titled Born in Salt in first person, which I did just because I like to try different things. In first person, the reader is even more in the character’s head, but it’s harder to tell a story that way because you can only show things that are happening to that one particular character.

7. POV Shifts-- Generally, third person limited, using one character's POV per scene with a break between any POV shifts, is the preferred method for writing thrillers. Do you subscribe to this technique? Why or why not?
Yes. Film and TV have advantages over books in being able to show the setting more easily. But one advantage of books is that the reader can really get inside the characters’ heads, and I think that’s a crucial part of the immersive process.

8. Sex and Violence-- Ah, now that I have your attention, let me ask you. What should writers keep in mind when writing scene with the two aforementioned topics.
First, keep your audience in mind. If you’re writing for kids or teens, obviously you can’t be graphic. Then, unless you’re writing erotica or torture porn, neither of which are my thing, don’t go overboard with the details. Just show what matters most to the characters and the plot development. Too many details get boring. We don’t need to read about every squeeze and thrust, or every punch or gun shot. Just give a taste, enough where the reader can fill in the details.

9. How important is the concept of time in the writing of a thriller?
Critical. Having a ticking clock, a deadline that the characters have to beat, adds a lot of tension. In Wrath of Leviathan, both the heroes and villain have deadlines. For example, Kiyoko, the main character, has to help her friends before they’re extradited. In Sleep State Interrupt, Waylee, the main character, has to figure out how to infiltrate a closed New Year’s Eve event and get everything they need to get inside and collect the information she needs, before Dec. 31. Then, they have an even bigger challenge to sneak into this high-security broadcast center and broadcast a video during the Super Bowl, and they have to figure all this out before the game starts. Then they have more problems after the game starts and are running out of time.


message 13: by T.C.

T.C. Weber The Wrath of Leviathan is now available for pre-order on Amazon in both Kindle and paperback format!

In Wrath of Leviathan, the second book of the BetterWorld cyberpunk trilogy, Waylee faces life in prison for daring to expose MediaCorp's schemes to control the world. Exiled in São Paulo, her sister Kiyoko and their hacker friends continue the fight, seeking to end the conglomerate's stranglehold on virtual reality, information, and politics. But MediaCorp and their government allies may quash the rebellion before it takes off. And unknown to Kiyoko and her friends, a team of ruthless mercenaries is after them, and is closing in fast.

https://www.amazon.com/Wrath-Leviatha...


message 11: by T.C.

T.C. Weber I posted some pictures from Sleep State Interrupt, including all the main characters:
https://www.goodreads.com/photo/work/...


message 10: by T.C. (last edited Aug 07, 2018 11:15AM)

T.C. Weber The Wrath of Leviathan is now available on Amazon as a paperback pre-order!

In Wrath of Leviathan, the second book of the BetterWorld cyberpunk trilogy, Waylee faces life in prison for daring to expose MediaCorp's schemes to control the world. Exiled in São Paulo, her sister Kiyoko and their hacker friends continue the fight, seeking to end the conglomerate's stranglehold on virtual reality, information, and politics. But MediaCorp and their government allies may quash the rebellion before it takes off. And unknown to Kiyoko and her friends, a team of ruthless mercenaries is after them, and is closing in fast.

https://www.amazon.com/Wrath-Leviatha...


message 9: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Sleep State Interrupt, my near-future cyberpunk thriller, is on sale this week for 99 cents on Kindle! If you haven't read it yet, check it out!
https://www.amazon.com/Sleep-State-In...

Sleep State Interrupt by T.C. Weber


message 8: by T.C.

T.C. Weber For an advance look at The Wrath of Leviathan, visit http://savethereefs.wixsite.com/tcweber, scroll down, and click the link to Chapter 1.

WARNING: Contains spoilers about the first book (Sleep State Interrupt), so if you haven't read the first book yet, the web site contains links to that too.

In Sleep State Interrupt, a giant media corporation has taken over the Internet, created an addictive virtual reality called BetterWorld, and controls nearly all information. Politicians do their bidding and a brainwashed humanity serves a privileged few. Waylee Freid, an unemployed Baltimore journalist with ever-worsening bipolar disorder, is the only hope for a brighter future. She and her countercultural friends bust a notorious teenage hacker out of jail and sneak into a closed presidential fundraiser at the Smithsonian castle, where they hope to record incriminating admissions that will wake up the world. Hunted by Homeland Security, Waylee and her friends must reach a sufficient audience by broadcasting their video during the Super Bowl. But to do so, they'll have to break into one of the most secure facilities ever built.

In Wrath of Leviathan, the second book of the BetterWorld trilogy, Waylee faces life in prison for daring to expose Media Corporation’s schemes to control the world. Her reality-challenged sister Kiyoko, her increasingly unhinged boyfriend Pel, and juvenile hacker genius Charles are hiding in São Paulo, Brazil, and trying to challenge MediaCorp’s monopoly over virtual reality and commerce. But a team of ruthless mercenaries and corrupt cops are after the trio, and are closing in fast. Meanwhile, MediaCorp and their government allies seek to quash the rebellion Waylee started, and tighten a grip over the world that could last for millennia.


message 7: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Hi, I put a bunch of free stories, novel excerpts, and drink recipes on my web site: http://savethereefs.wixsite.com/tcweber

Navigate to the "Free Stuff" tab. Enjoy!


message 6: by T.C.

T.C. Weber The Wrath of Leviathan, first of two sequels to Sleep State Interrupt, is coming out Sep. 1.

In this near-future thriller, Waylee faces life in prison for daring to expose Media Corporation’s schemes to control the world. Her reality-challenged sister Kiyoko, her increasingly unhinged boyfriend Pel, and juvenile hacker genius Charles are hiding in São Paulo, Brazil, and trying to challenge MediaCorp’s monopoly over virtual reality and commerce. But a team of ruthless mercenaries and corrupt cops are after the trio, and are closing in fast. Meanwhile, MediaCorp and their government allies seek to quash the rebellion Waylee started, and tighten a grip over the world that could last for millennia.


message 5: by T.C.

T.C. Weber I posted some short stories ranging from children's to slipstream. Check them out!


message 4: by T.C.

T.C. Weber If you've won or bought Sleep State Interrupt, posting a short review would be very helpful. It's the only way other readers will know about it. Thanks!


message 3: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Why Your Reviews Matter
by Chaz Bufe, publisher See Sharp Press

Your reviews matter, probably more than you realize.

There has been a drastic decline in the numbers of magazines and newspapers over the past two decades, and an even more drastic decline in the number that carry book reviews. The number of daily papers in the U.S. dropped roughly 15% over the past quarter century, and a great many of those remaining have reduced or entirely eliminated their book review sections. (This is in line with their overall reductions in news and feature coverage during the same period due to huge, presumably Internet-caused, revenue drops.)

The status of weekly papers is perhaps even more dire. Forty years ago there were independent weeklies in almost every major and mid-size city in the country, and a great many carried reviews. Since then, those that survived have been, and are still being, gobbled up by media conglomerates, the New Times chain being emblematic. That chain bought weeklies in half of the country’s largest markets, and the New Times papers I’m familiar with (and probably all or nearly all of the rest) do not review books.

The situation here in Tucson is a case in point. Six years ago, Arizona’s oldest daily newspaper, The Tucson Citizen, went under. The remaining Tucson daily, The Arizona Daily Star, now devotes only a half-page to reviews in its Sunday edition (no space at all in the others), and the formerly independent Tucson Weekly has been bought twice over the last 15 years by small media conglomerates. It used to carry weekly in-depth reviews of books by local authors. No more. Following its most recent sale, it stopped carrying book reviews and almost everything else that made it worth reading. It’s now little more than an advertising sheet of use only as bird cage liner (which is, literally, what I use it for — I normally don’t even bother looking inside it).

Magazines are in somewhat similar shape. Circulation (especially news stand circulation) has been declining simultaneously with the ascent of the Internet, and revenue has been plummeting: from $48.3 billion in 2007 to $27 billion in 2015. Two specialty magazines, Guitar Player and Bass Player, owned by the same company, are a case in point. From their glory days in the 1990s, their circulation has dropped by roughly half, and a few years ago they combined their staffs in a cost-cutting move. The end result of all this is that magazines have cut back their coverage, and it’s harder than ever to get reviews. (Bass Player and Guitar Player are exceptions to the rule, and are still very good about reviewing books.)

Compounding all this is the explosion in the annual number of new books over the past 25 years or so. The number of new titles reported by Books in Print, the best source for information on physical books, more than doubled over the last 15 years; the current total of new print books exceeds 300,000 per year. Add in e-books, and the number is likely over 1,000,000. (No one really knows how many e-books are published annually.)

Add this all up, and you have far more books competing for far fewer reviews in the remaining magazines and newspapers (the situation is similar with online review sites, which are overwhelmed), and for what little shelf space remains in bookstores.

The number of independent bookstores, where readers in decades past could discover books that received few or no reviews, has declined drastically over the past half-century. At present, they account for only 10% of the book market. So, that channel for readers to discover books has all but disappeared.

To make matters even worse, the large-circulation magazines tend to ignore books from small presses and to review primarily, often only, books from the half-dozen conglomerates that dominate the book publishing industry, and both television (and syndication-dominated) radio talk shows tend to book only the authors published by those same conglomerates.

What’s left for small publishers? Reader reviews on Goodreads, Amazon, Kobo, B&N, and other online retailer sites.

If you read a book that you like issued by an independent publisher, please consider writing even a one- or two-sentence review for Goodreads or any of the online book retailers. It’ll help both the author and the small publisher. And it’ll help other readers discover books they would enjoy.

Your reviews are more important than you think.

(reprinted from https://seesharppress.wordpress.com/2...)


message 2: by T.C.

T.C. Weber The first four chapters (0-3) of my upcoming cyberpunk thriller, Sleep State Interrupt, are available for free at http://www.seesharppress.com/SSIsampl.... Check it out!


message 1: by T.C.

T.C. Weber Free short story: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view...
Waylee Freid, a young reporter in a near-future Baltimore, uncovers evidence that a powerful corporation called MediaCorp secretly co-opted the government to take control of nearly everything people see and hear. Can she get her evidence out and reverse the process before it's too late? Or will her editors succumb to outside pressure and bury her story?


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